.
Mlynov and Muravits under Tsar Nicholas I



KehilaLinks

***

Listing of Mlynov and Marvits Ancestors by Approximate Birth Date

Until Russian census records are translated, we have to rely on guesstimates of the birthdates of the earliest names we have of ancestors who lived in Mlynov. To date, we have a pretty good idea of the birthdate and birth location of those who immigrated from Mlynov and Marvits and have left behind immigration records. We can guesstimate the birthdate of their parents and grandparents, whose names we sometimes have, by subtracting 17 years from the eldest child's birthdate for the men and 15 years for the women. Of course,the age of the parents at the birth of their first child was more variable than that. With the earliest generation whose names we have in hand, we know they were living in Mlynov or Marvits when their children were born, but in many cases we do not know where they were born or exactly when they arrived in Mlynov or Marvits.

Ancestors likely born (1825–1855) in the Reign of Tsar Nicholas I

Dates Name Birth Location Additional Info
~1837– ~1903 Moshe Gruber Mlynov? owned iron foundry in Mlynov, father of Rivkah (Gruber) Demb
~1840–~1900 Peretz Schwartz Mlynov? father of Chaim, Morris, Michael and Israel.
~1840–50–? Avrum Goldseker Mlynov? father of sons (order of births unknown) Yoel, Yankel, Moishe, Hirsch, Shimon.
~1846–1902 Solomon Mandelkern Mlynov left Mlynov as orphan in 1860 at the age of 14
~1850–1903 Mordechai Rivitz Mlynov? father of Ida (Rivitz) Fax and David Rivitz
~1850-52–? Berel and Toba Fishman Mlynov? parents of Moishe, Anna, Sarah, David and Meyer Fishman
~1851–? Zecil Rivitz orphan in Simphoropl mother of Ida (Rivitz) Fax and David Rivitz, immigrated to Baltimore in 1909
~1853–~1910 Israel Jacob Demb Ludmir? brought to Mlynov from Ludmir by father-in-law Moshe Gruber to marry Rivkah Gruber
~1853–~1910 Rivkah (Gruber) Demb Mlynov married Israel Jacob Demb from Ludmir at age 11, majority of children and grandchildren migrated to Baltimore

Ancestors likely born (1855–1881) in the Reign of Alexander II

Dates Name Birth Location Additional Info
~1859–? David Marder Mlynov? father of Isaac Marder
~1862–1929 Getzel Fax Demydivka married Ida Rivitz, lived outside Mlynov, first pioneer to Baltimore from Mlynov relatives
~1863–1946 Chaim (Hyman) Schwartz Mlynov married Yetta Demb, immigrated to Baltimore in 1912
~1863–1947 Tsodik Shulman Lithuania nephew of famous Kalman Shulman, married Pearl Malka Demb, migrated to Baltimore in 1921
~1864– ~1913 Simha Gruber Mlynov son of Israel Jacob and Rivkah (Gruber) Demb, children migrated to Baltimore
~1864–1939 Pesse Demb (later Bessie Hurwitz) Mlynov married David Rivitz, followed husband to Baltimore in 1909
~1866–1954 Joseph (Avram) Lerner Mlynov married Rose, arrived in Baltimore 1912
~1867–1939 Ida (Rivitz) Fax on way back to Mlynov daughter of Mordechai and Zecil, early pioneer to Baltimore with husband Getzel
~1867–1939 Michael Mischel Heschie Swartz Schwartz Mlynov? immigrated to Baltimore in 1907
~1867–1926 Shimon Goldseker Mlynov married Anna Fishman
~1867–1914 Anna (Fishman) Goldseker Mlynov married Shimon Goldseker
~1867–1942 Ben Tzion Meren Mlynov married Miriam Goldseker
~1870–1969 Rose (Radie) Lerner (Cooper) Mlynov married Joseph Lerner, immigration to Baltimore in 1920
~1870–1962 Yetta (also Yenta) (Demb) Schwartz Mlynov married Chaim Schwartz, immigrated to Baltimore 1912
~1870–1942 Miriam (Goldseker) Meren Mlynov married Ben Tzion Meren
~1870–1954 Joseph Shargel ("Szargel") Luck In 1925, Joseph and his wife Yetta Breidl (Weiner) followed several children to Baltimore and left several of the younger children behind in Mlynov, with hopes of bringing the children to the US.
~1871–1929 Motel Demb (later Max Demming) Mlynov son of Israel Jacob and Rivkah (Gruber) Demb, immigrated to Baltimore in 1924
~1872–1956 Yetta Breinl (Weiner) Shargel Mlynov? In 1925, Yetta and her husband Joseph followed several children to Baltimore and left several of the younger children behind in Mlynov, with hopes of bringing the children to the US.
~1873–1968 Moishe (Morris #1) Fishman Mlynov son of Berel and Toba Fishman, immigrated to Palestine in 1921 and helped found Moshav Balfouria
~1873–1943 Morris (Moses) Schwartz Mlynov son of Peretz and Lea, immigrated to Baltimore in 1907
~1874–1935 Israel M. Schwartz Mlynov son of Peretz and Lea, immigrated to Baltimore in 1911
~1876–1942 Isaac Marder Mlynov
~1876–1970 Aaron Demb Mlynov son of Israel Jacob and Rivkah (Gruber) Demb, migrated to Baltimore in 1914
~1878–1954 Sarah (Fishman) Schwartz Mlynov married Israel Schwartz, immigrated to Baltimore in 1912
1880–? Yosef Halperin Mlynov

Ancestors likely born (1881–1914) after the assasination of Alexander II , in Reign of Alexander III and son Nicholas II

The assasination of Alexander II in 1881 triggered a retrenchment in Russian policy towards the Jews and a series of pogroms that became a catalyst for the mass migration to the United States and the early foundation of the Zionist movement. These Mlynov ancestors were born during this period. Many of them migrated to the United States and Baltimore in particular.

Dates Name Birth Location Additional Info
~1881–1954 Theresa (Fax) Goodman Mlynov migrated to Baltimore with parents, Getzel and Ida (Rivitz) Fax, in 1890–91
~1881–1951 Clara (Tessler) Marder Mlynov wife of Isaac Marder, joined husband in Baltimore in 1920
1882–1959 Mollya (Gruber) Herman Mlynov married Israel Herman, migrated to Baltimore in 1912
1882–1942 Israel Halperin Mlynov
1883–1966 Samuel Fox Mlynov brother of Getzel Fax, immigrated to Baltimore in 1904, subsequently a widower and married his niece Minnie Hurwitz in 1910
1884–1979 Gulza ("Margalit") (Rivitz) Mazer Mlynov married Lejzor Mazuryk (Louis Mazer), moved to Berestechko, migrated to Baltimore in 1921
1884–1965 Meyer Fishman Mlynov first marriage to Ida (Goldseker) Fishman, migrated to New York in 1909, living in Baltimore by 1911
~1884–1936 Esther Fannie ("Ethel Brodski") Mlynov married Morris Schwartz, followed Morris to Baltimore in 1907, traveling with his brother
~1885–1971 Nathan Gruber Mlynov son of Simha Gruber, migrated to Baltimore in 1912
1885–1918 Isaac Rivitz Mlynov son of David and Bessie, migrated to Baltimore in about 1906, died of Spanish flu in 1918
1886–1977 Minnie (Hurwitz) Fox Mlynov migrated to Baltimore with mother Bessie (Demb) Hurwitz in 1909, married uncle Getzel's brother, Sam Fox
1888–1968 Ida (Goldseker) Fishman Mlynov married Meyer Fishman, migrated with son to Baltimore in 1912. Remarried Sam Gresser in Baltimore
1887–~1942 Nachuma (Shulman) Meiler Mlynov oldest daughter of Tsodik and Pearl Malka (Demb) Shulman, married Saul (Shaye) Meiler, fled Nazis but were captured and killed
1888–~1968 Nachuma (Shulman) Meiler Mlynov daughter of Tsodik and Pearl (Demb) Shulman, married Saul (Shaye) Meiler, fled Nazis but family captured and killed
1889–? Liza (Shulman) Koszhushner Mlynov daughter of Tsodik and Pearl Malka (Demb) Shulman, fled Nazis with family and made it to Kiev and survived the War
1890–1970 Simon Shulman Mlynov immigrated to Baltimore in 1922
1891–1937 Benjamin Schwartz Mlynov son of Chaim and Yetta (Demb) Schwartz, immigrated to Baltimore in 1910 ahead of his family.
1891–1976 Mollie (Shargel) Feingold Mlynov daughter of Joseph and Yetta Breindl (Weiner) Shargel, immigrated to NY in late 1909 and married Abraham Feingold, moved to Baltimore by 1914
1893–1973 Samuel Gruber Mlynov migrated to Baltimore in 1912
1893– ~1942 Pearl (Goldsker) Pressman Mlynov perished in the Holocaust
1893–1978 Norton ("Nuchim") Schwartz Mlynov son of Chaim and Yetta (Demb) Schwartz, immigrated to Baltimore in 1912 with his parents and brother Paul
1894–1964 Ertz (Harry) Shulman Mlynov immigrated to Baltimore in 1921
1894–1964 Isadore (Yitzchak) Lerner Mlynov son of Joseph and Radie Lerner, arrived in Baltimore 1913
1896–1989 Eta (Goldseker) Fishman Mlynov married first cousin David Fishman in Palestine, left Palestine for Baltimore in 1929
1896–1981 Morris Fishman #2 Mlynov son of David and Sivia Fishman, grandson of Berel and Toba, immigrated to Baltimore in 1912
1897–~1942 Baila Goldseker Collidge Mlynov perished in the Holocaust
1897–~1970 Julius ("Itzik") Shargel Mlynov son of Joseph and Yetta Breindl (Weiner) Shargel, immigrated to NY in 1911, engaged in Baltimore by 1921
1898–~1942 Charna Goldseker Gruber Mlynov married Shmuel Gruber, perished in the Holocaust
1898–1973 Morris Goldseker Mlynov migrated to Baltimore in 1913
1899–1995 Rose (Hurwitz) Finkelstein Margalith Mlynov arrived in Baltimore in early 1909
1899–1965 David Dudek Fishman 1899-1965 Marvits migrated to Palestine with parents in 1921, married first cousin Eta Goldseker, left Palestine for Baltimore in 1929
1900–1975 Irene (Ida/Chaia) (Schwart) Edelstein Mlynov immigrated to Baltimore with mother and brother in 1912
1900–1980 Sonia Demb (later Sylvia Penn) Mlynov immigrated to Springfield, MA in 1921
1902–1994 Clara (Hurwitz) Fram Mlynov arrived in Baltimore in early 1909
1902–1993 Benjamin Fishman Marvits immigrated to Baltimore without his parents' permission in 1920
1902–1975 Morris (Moische) Lerner Mlynov son of Joseph and Radie Lerner, arrived in Baltimore in 1920
1902–1956 Paul Schwartz Mlynov son of Israel and Sarah (Fishman) Schwartz, arrived in Baltimore with mother and sister in 1912
1902–1992 Paul H. Schwartz Mlynov youngest son of Chaim and Yetta Schwartz, immigrated to Baltimore in 1912 with parents and brother Norton. Married first cousin Pauline Shulman in about 1926
1903–1991 Sarah (Marder) Mutter Mlynov daughter of Isaac and Clara (Tessler) Marder, immigrated to Baltimore with mother and siblings in 1920
1904–2002 David (Samuel "Sonny") Goldseker Mlynov immigrated to Baltimore in 1926 after a several year stay in Buenos Aires
1904–1990 Clara (Shulman) Fishman Mlynov immigrated to Baltimore in 1921, married Marvits born Benjamin "Bene" Fishman there
1904–1975 Anna (Hene) Miller (Lerner) Mlynov daughter of Joseph and Radie Lerner, arrived in Baltimore in 1920

Ancestors likely born during or after the 1905 Russian Revolution, in the reign of Nicholas II

After Russia was defeated in the 19041905 Russo-Japanese War, long simmering tensions broke forth in riots, strikes and unrest across the Russian empire in what is called the Russian Revolution of 1905. The period was marked by increased immigration of Jews to the United States, for some a growing pessimism about integration as a strategy, and for others hopes that a revolutionary transformation could produce equality for the Jews in Russia.

Dates Name Birth Location Additional Info
1905–1985 Pauline "Pepe" (Shulman) Schwartz Mlynov daughter of Tsodik and Pearl Malka (Demb) Shulman, immigrated to Baltimore in 1921 then in 1926 married first cousin Paul Schwartz, from Mlynov
1905–1971 Chuva (Fishman) Slivka Marvits immigrated to Palestine with her parents, Moishe and Chava (Gilden) in 1921
1905–1986 Pauline (Marder) Samuels Bargteil Mlynov daughter of Isaac and Clara (Tessler) Marder, immigrated with mother and siblings to Baltimore in 1920
1906–1979 Bernard Shargel Mlynov son of Joseph and Yetta Breindl (Weiner) Shargel, immigrated to Baltimore in Jan. 1929 via El Paso, Tx, after a stay for several years in Mexico[1]
1907–? Sara (Soara) Simon (Lerner) Mlynov daughter of Joseph and Radie Lerner, arrived in Baltimore in 1920
1907–1969 Lipa Halperin Mlynov son of Israel Halperin, date migrated to Israel not yet known. Editor of the Mlynov-Muravica Memorial Book
1908–1999 Louis G. Demb Mlynov son of Aaron and Bessie Demb, migrated with his mother to Baltimore in 1920
1908–1990 Julius Deming Mlynov son of Max and Freida (Korusnia) Demb, immigrated to NY in 1926 via a stay in Beunos Aires
1908–1996 Boruch Meren Mlynov son of Ben Zion Meren and Miriam (Goldseker) Meren, displaced person, immigrated to Palestine, married Mlynov born Amelia Shargel in 1939 who helped him get to Baltimore where he was naturalized in 1945 [1]
1909–1972 Chuna "Juan" Goldceker Mlynov immigrated to and settled in Argentina
1909–2005 Sophie (Lerner) Glick Mlynov daughter of Joseph and Radie Lerner, arrived in Baltimore in 1920
1909–1992 Nathan Marder Mlynov son of Isaac and Clara (Tessler) Marder, immigrated with mother and siblings to Baltimore in 1920
1910–2005 Amelia (Shargel) Meren Mlynov daughter of Joseph and Yetta Breindl (Weiner) Shargel, migrated to Baltimore in 1929 at El Paso via railroad, after a stay in Mexico, naturalized in 1935, traveled in 1939 to Palestine to marry Boruch Meren and help him get into the US. [1]

***

Notes

[1] I learned this story from Audrey (Goldseker) Polt. Based on conversation with her father, who was a close friend of Bernard Shargel, Audrey wrote the following: "In 1926, at the age of 14, Amelia Shargel and her younger brother, Earl, moved into a rented room in Shimon Goldseker's house in Mlynov. Their parents immigrated to America in hopes of bringing the children later. In December 1926, they left Mlynov and joined their two older brothers in Mexico, Yizkah (Isaac) and Bernard. Amelia, Earl and Bernard joined their parents in America in 1929."


Compiled by Howard I. Schwartz
Updated:October 2019
Copyright 2019 Howard I. Schwartz

Webpage Design by Howard I. Schwartz
Want to search for more information: JewishGen Home Page
Want to look at other Town pages: KehilaLinks Home Page

***


This page is hosted at no cost to the public by JewishGen, Inc., a non-profit corporation. If it has been useful to you, or if you are moved by the effort to preserve the memory of our lost communities, your JewishGen-erosity would be deeply appreciated.