Huşi, Romania

46°41' N, 28°04' E

Alternate names: Huşi [Rom], Khush [Yid], Husch [Ger], Hussburg [Ger], Khushi [Rus], Huszváros [Hun]


Jewish Husi: Schools

A school class


The following information was provided by Adrian Menura, translated from the book, Studii Si Articole Privind Istoria Orasului Husi, Vol.1, p. 336-337:
"Doctor Balsian's report, health/hygiene inspector, as of 08.02.1893 accounts for 10 Jewish/Hebrew schools with 195 students, but only the school led by 'calligrapher' Haim Michael Baron received the authorization to operate. More schools are mentioned, such as Marcu Pfefer Horn with 35 students, Iocub Iosub Kati with 40 students, Strul Avramovici with 35 students, and Azic Katz. The most modern school, led by H. Rosenfeld, opened in 1897 with 50 students; the teacher there was the distinguished poet, Avram Axelrad. Hebrew was taught by Mr. Simon Zisu Fenerstain. The school was established in March 1904 under the name of Israelite-Romanian Institute 'Culture.' All the other schools were gradually shut down under the Bill Number 29 of March 12 issued by the Primary School Committee of Husi."
Additional information from Encyclopedia of the Jewish Communities: Romania, Vol.1, Husi by Theodore Lavi, trans. Robert Sherins:
"In 1875 the 'Bnei Brit' bureau was established and a year later it opened an elementary school for 56 students. But the school closed because of the ultra religious groups opposition and in 1877 they opened a 'Talmud Torah,' where the kids studied only holy subjects. In 1897, an organization called 'Cultura' was formed with the goal to open a modern school and indeed, the same year such a school was opened to 246 students, with the congregation's support. But, again the orthodox circles undermined it and this school also became a 'Talmud Torah.'


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