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A SHORT HISTORY OF THE JEWS OF BOLLENDORF

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COMMEMORATION 1938-2008
JONATHAN GOLDSCHMIDT: WHAT THE COMMEMORATION IN BOLLENDORF ON NOVEMBER 9 MEANS TO ME
A SHORT HISTORY OF JEWS IN BOLLENDORF
MEMORIES OF BOLLENDORF
BELLA HEPPENHEIMER
MARTHE KRISTELLER
HELEN HERRMANN
DANIEL MAYER
WALLY MAYER
A MAP OF BOLLENDORF
IN MEMORIAM
PHOTOS OF BOLLENDORF, NOVEMBER 2008
STOLPERSTEINE PROJECT

BOLLENDORF is a village located in the German Province of Rhineland-Pfalz, at the border with Luxemburg.  Its administrative district is Bitburg.  It is also  about 40 kms from the city of Trier.  It sits on the banks of the River Sauer, which makes up the border with Luxemburg.  The bridge over the Sauer leads to the Luxemburg part of Bollendorf.
 
Currently it has a population of about 1200.  The center of the village has not changed much, but it has expanded up the various surrounding hills.  Tourists come to Bollendorf to walk along the river or hike in the deep forests.
 
The first Jews arrived in Bollendorf around 1843.  The 1843 census indicates 6 Jews.  In 1895 there were 66 Jews.  The majority were Levy's and probably came from Aach, a small town closer to Trier with a larger Jewish community (57 Jews in 1808).  The other names among Bollendorf Jews are Mayer, Joseph and Steinberger. At the beginning of the war, there were 17 Jewish families.  You can see where they lived on the map of Bollendorf on another part of this site.
 
Many of the Jews were cattle or horse dealers.  Later, some opened up other businesses: a bakery, a small department store, a clothing store, a construction tiles business, a photographer, a cafe, a butcher. 
 
A foundry was operating in the 1850's and it is believed that the need for logging and for wood to supply the furnaces of the foundry and therefore the need for draft animals prompted the arrival of Jewish horse and cattle dealers.
 

 Copyright 2011 Suzanne Mayer Tarica

Email: suzanne.tarica@gmail.com