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This site is created as a way to further research and publication of materials on the history of Lyakhovichi.If you have been aided in your research and wish to contribute materials and resources to further our knowledge, contact Gary Palgon and ask how you can help.

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Twentieth Century Records:
Soviet Records of Lyakhovichi Residents and Emigres (from 1939 until the end of the Soviet system)


This is a page in our Documents section.Click the "Documents" button in the left-hand column to see others in this section.

This page looks at records created in the time period beginning with the Soviet acquisition of the region just before World War II, and the page is still more hope than actuality. The hard work of identifying all of the variety of records that can be searched in the archives of the Soviet Union and the Belarus Socialist Republic, by the birth residence of a citizen, is a task for another research group with a wider focus. We can only look at those materials that are currently known and begin the extraction process of Jewish residents of Lyakhovichi and its immediate surrounds. We are aided by the Soviet system of identifying all residents by their nationality, and defining the Jews in Soviet domains, as of the "nationality" Jewish. Further, their early attempts at nation-wide registration of all citizens, used a birth date and specific town of birth, as a way to distinguish between many people with the same name. So as more records are made available and entered into databases, we will find that we can identify Jewish men and women born in Lyakhovichi even when they are resident far from their birthplaces in the soviets of Uzbekhistan, Kazakhstan, the Russian Siberian regions, and the far inland cities of the Russian state.

The last generation of Jews to be born in Lyakhovichi, were born there before the Second World War.. No significant numbers of Jews returned to the 500 year old community, following the annihilation of the Jewish population by the Nazis. Jews born in Lyakhovichi who died elsewhere in the Soviet Union (unless they were murdered by the Nazis or died during an enemy action in World War II) had a death certificate prepared in the city in which they died and that record was recorded in the central registry of that Soviet. In 2007, I have not yet heard of a way to search other than by name of the deceased in a specific town of death. If you have copies of Soviet death records showing a Lyakhovichi town of birth, please share your images for posting here. Soviet marriage records of those born in Lyakhovichi (so mostly from the 1940s through 1960s) will be found in the Soviet cities where they lived. Those created in Lyakhovichi, in the short period of Soviet occupation before the war, have not been separately identified but are presumably with the ZAGs records of the community under the jurisdiction of the Belarus Ministry of Justice. Again, Soviet era marriage records show the place of birth and the legal nationality of the marrying parties.

There are several types of records immediately available and each is suggestive of many more waiting to be found in the archives of Russia and the former Soviets.

The records that are among the first to come to light, are those related to the military service of Soviet citizens in the "Great Patriotic War," as World War II is still best known in the former Soviet republics. Lyakhovichi-born men and women, who fled the German invasion and German captivity and made it to the Soviet border, were usually drafted into the Soviet Army almost immediately. Some, having not made it out of German-held territory, were able to join up with partisans, some of which partisan groups were connected to the Soviets. And a another group, who had fled during World War I to the safe havens of Slutsk and Minsk, had found themselves unable to escape from the Soviet Union in its earliest days, and with the Germans on the doorstep in WWII fled inland or joined up with the Red Army to fight back. As efforts to document the service to a nation while the veterans were still alive, picked up speed in the 1980s and 1990s, genealogists were among the beneficiaries. Official lists of veterans were combed by other veterans who looked for their units to document. A Jewish veteran's group gathered the names of Jewish soldiers who had died in World War II, from those lists into a series of publications. The compilation of books called Kniga pamiati voinov-evreev pavshikh v boiakh s natsizmom: 1941-1945 (Book of Memory of Jewish Soldiers who fell in battle with Nazism 1941-1945) was published, in Moscow, from 1994 to 2002. It is a remarkable source on those who actually died in the Soviet Armed forces. Each volume contains an alphabetically arranged set of short biographic descriptions. Name, place of birth and residence, rank, military specialty, where the person perished, and the source of this information is provided for almost all. Photos on some appear as well. It is available in the United States at the Library of Congress; Yeshiva University; Princeton University; Yale University Library; University of Chicago, Stanford Univerity; and a number of others. But of the eight different volumes shown in worldcat.org (for finding a book title in a library), most do not even have two years of publication at the same library, a situation calling out for scanning and digitization. If you would like to participate in a simple user-conducted collaborative effort, you could photocopy pages at a library and then send them to JewishGen's ViewMate for community translation. Copyright considerations may preclude them being posted for longer than is necessary to gain translation. If ViewMate is not available for this type of project and you think that you have found Lyakhovichi people or people who share names of your family members from Lyakhovichi, send them to us and if they are relevant, we will post the extracted information. If you have already examined pages from this material and found soldiers from our region of Belarus, we will happily post the extracted information on our site. Additional Military Service information is also available from the Military History Archive in Moscow (RGVIA) Rossiiskii gosudarstvennyi voenno-istoricheskii arkhiv and the Russian State Archive of the Navy in St. Petersburg (RGAVMF) Rossiiskii gosudarstvennyi arkhiv Voenno-Morskogo Flota These sources are most useful if the length of service did not entirely coincide with World War II. Also, as in most military systems, there is a great deal more material on officers than on enlisted men. The Central Archives for the History of the Jewish People have identified a number of records in the Naval Historic Archives on Jewish sailors and officers. To send for these records, it is important to remember that Archivists anywhere are not set up to do individual genealogical searches. You should know your party's name and at least the approximate years and branch of service.

Those who would uncover archival documents, are always engaged in the process of deciding which projects to fund and staff first. The Soviet government had a real policy of denigrating all Jewish materials in Soviet state archives to a category of "third level" which they defined as of "no historical value." An archivist was not encouraged to spend his time cataloging such material when there was so much more relevant work to do. State Archives were actively dissuaded from spending limited resources conserving such material. When the Soviet system fell apart, the newly independent nations found themselves without the cash resources to maintain the parts of its collections long-recognized as national treasures, much less the Jewish sections, which had long been neglected. Jewish historical,genealogical, and academic organizations, would like the volunteers to staff every project and the money to fund all of them, but lacking that, information related to the Holocaust has usually taken priority, as we want to identify the dead and missing, in the lifetimes of those that still mourn them.

An estimated 1 million Jews were deported from the western sections of the Soviet Union to the Soviet interior and the Soviet Asiatic nations, by Stalin, between the 1930s and 1942. Some went to political prisons, some's fate were never determined, and some had the happy fate of being sent inland as "unreliable in the face of a German occupation." The last group and their families, were sent reeling across the Soviet landscape, to end up in relative safety, in the various Soviet republics of Uzbekhistan, Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, Kyrigzstan, and Tadzhikistan. Others found themselves in the Siberian tribal lands of the Russian Federation. Please do not call these people EVACUEES. There was no benevolent intent by the Soviets in these forcible moves that dropped unprepared people thousand of miles from home with little warning or preparation. They were victims of a system that did not care whether they lived or died in the move and many died. Even those whose warrant was served as the Nazis entered Soviet territory, owed no thanks to the Soviets for hauling them off to prison or confinement in another Soviet territory. The Soviet government deported Jews, Poles, Crimeans, Ukrainians, and dozens of other nationalities. It did not matter to them if hundreds of thousands or millions died, it was simply irrelevant. In Belarus and Western Ukraina, the two years between the signing of the Ribbentrop-Molotov pact in 1939 and the Nazi invasion, saw over 1 million people, from every walk of life deported by the Soviets. Put into train cars and sent east, most were never reunited with their families who never learned their fate. Lyakhovichi victims of this persecution included those who were identified with teaching, government services, banking, merchants, small business owners, veterans of the Polish Army, and others. We have some names of Lyakhovichi natives who died in Tashkent, others who died in Siberia: most of those who died in the Soviet forcible relocations are as undocumented as those who died at the hands of Nazi murderers. But those who survived, were registered. And some of those who did not make it through the hardships of Siberian and North Asian winters unprepared, did manage to meet the Soviet requirement to register first. Those who arrived in the central Asian nations had to register quickly with the authorities, and the cards they filled in, give (in the following order): Surname; Given Name; Patrynomic; Birth year; gender; the town from which evacuated; Province from which evacuated; and an ID number. The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum funded a project headed by Professor Saidjon Kurbanov, working in the Central State Archives of Uzbekistan, in the city of Tashkent. He and his group of researchers waded through a quarter-million registry cards, which with dependents, included almost 340,000 individuals who were registered in Uzbekhistan in February 1942. Professor Kurbanov reports that as large as this group of cards is, it is only a fraction of those who came to Uzbekhistan. It does not include those whose arrival point was an Uzhbek city other than Tashkent. It does not include those whose arrival date was after February 1942. It does not include those families who joined up with the deportee, not having been included in the deportation order. With all of those exclusions, Professor Kurbanov's task and resolution of the same, was remarkable. His group carefully handled and processed all of that materia,l to end up with a group of around 152,000 Jewish registration cards (the remainder were for deportees of other nationalities). Each was scanned and is available for study at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. For this webpage, the webmaster has extracted just those names where the last residence was Lyakhovichi or Baranovichi, and so far we have found over 200+ names. Open JewishGen's site Jewish Refugees in Tashkent, in another window, to learn more about the database and to see images of the actual registration cards for each. You can use our list of names in side by side windows to gain names from our towns and then see the actual records for each person. Then simply close that window and return to research on this page. These kind of records are incredibly valuable, and are probably in existence in more places. According to various sources, the area around Lyakhovichi also saw deportations on a large scale to Kazakhastan (over five million former Polish subjects including Poles, military veterans, bourgeois of all descriptions, and Jews, were deported to Kazakhastan just before and in the early days of World War II). If your research or reading or personal knowledge of archives has made you aware of the identification of similar groups of records in other State Archives, please let us know!

Soviet National Identity Cards The twenty-four pages of a typical Soviet "identity card" bely the image that goes with the English word "card." This was not a simple wallet-sized document that one carried casually. This was a document without which you could not get housing, or a job, or travel from one city to another. If you were a person in your fifties who had grown up in the Soviet system, your identity papers included three photographs, one taken at age 16, one at age 25, and a final one at 45. You were required to notify the Ministry of Internal Affairs of a change of address, and that address had to be in a city in which you were previously authorized to live. The repository that holds the archives of the Ministry of Internal Affairs is the State Archives of the Russian Federation in Moscow (GARF) -Gosudarstvennyi arkhiv Rossiiskoi Federatsii. This is the same archives that holds records of the judicial, criminal investigation, and penal systems. This archive has de-classified many of its holdings, and allows research, by competent authorities, without major restriction. Information on this archive is from ArcheoBiblioBase -Archives in Russia, a site maintained by the International Institute of Social History and published online at http://www.iisg.nl/~abb/index.html. (last verified September 2007). We need the knowledge from your experience in this archive. What kind of indices are available to aid in a search for these identity documents? Are the index materials themselves available for photoduplication? Are there other Soviet era documents that we should search for instead or sooner because of easier access or reference tools?





Soviet Registration Card for Deportee to Tashkent, Wolf Kontorowicz
Deportation Registration Card

Wolf Kontorowicz of Lyakhovichi in Tashkent
Click on the title to go to larger image. Click back on your browser to return to this page

Soviet Registration Card for Deportee to Tashkent, Fanvel Malovitski
Deportation Registration Card

Fanvel Malovitski of Lyakhovichi in Tashkent
Click on the title to go to larger image. Click back on your browser to return to this page

The Russo-Finnish War While Lyakhovichi was not part of the Soviet Union until 1939, Lechovichers who had been living in Russian cities like Minsk and Slutsk as early as 1921 were reported in Soviet records. World War Two was not the first time Lyakhovichi's Jews served in the armies of the Soviet Union. The Russo-Finnish War was one in which they participated. A Lechovicher named Karabelnik who met up with Wilfred Kay (ne Shlomo Katz) when Wilfred made his way home from a Soviet orphanage to the Lyakhovichi area to look for his family in 1945. Karabelnik had been born in Lyakhovichi, lived in Baranovichi, and was drafted for the Finnish War. He was among the tens of thousands captured by the Finns and served out World War II in a Finnish prisoner of war camp. He was more fortunate than many - having gone home first to look for his family, he made his way out of Soviet lands while it was still possible in 1945. The Soviet government viewed most who had been in Finnish prisoner camps as traitors and sent them to prison camps and gulags in Siberia.

Soviet POWs in Finland pulling farm equipment



 


Important Notes about This Page

All names on this page were included in Surname Index Nov 2009

Find any name on this page by hitting "control F" on your keyboard and typing in the name.

Find any name anywhere on this website by going to the Google Search bar and typing the name immediately before this phrase
site:http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/lyakhovichi/

from the word "site" to the slash after lyakhovichi (just cut and paste it into your browser)



Soviet Registration Card for Deportee to Tashkent, Chaim Budovlia
Deportation Registration Card

Khaim Budowlia of Lyakhovichi in Tashkent
Click on the title to go to larger image. Click back on your browser to return to this page

Sara Ita Mintz was a Deportee to Tashkent by Stalin's Soviet Union in 1940s. Here she is at her father's grave in Lyakhovichi,Belarus  a few years earlier.
Sara Ita Mintz,
Lyakhovichi deportee to Tashkent who died in Tashkent

This picture was taken a few years earlier at her father's grave (Samson ben Abraham Yitzhak MINTZ) in the New Cemetery of Lyakhovichi

Isaac Shklyar of  Baranovichi in Soviet Army Uniform
Isaac Shklyar of Baranovichi in Soviet Uniform
His family fled Lyakhovichi in World War I, settling in Baranovichi after a brief sojourn in Slutsk. He and his uncle were on a bicycle vacation when the Germans invaded and fled into the Soviet Union where both men enlisted. He was one of the first Soviet soldiers into Baranovichi and it was then that he found that his family had been murdered by the Nazis.

Countess Rejtan of Lyakhovichi, deported by the Soviets to Siberia
Countess Rejtan
, who lived with her husband in the manor house of Lyakhovichi in 1900, and is reported as a widowed landowner in the 1920s-30's Business Directories of our community, was also deported from Lyakhovichi by the Soviets. She died in Siberia where she had been deported alongside several Jewish neighbors from Lyakhovichi. She and her husband had a generous and positive reputation among the Jewish community, and if the community had survived, they would no doubt have mourned her unhappy fate. We are looking for more information on the Lyakhovichi Jews who had been deported to the same region of Siberia.

Table of Deportees from
Lyakhovichi and Baranovichi
in Belarus
to Tashkent

To reduce the footprint of the table, I have eliminated the column for the town from which they were deported. All of those included in this list were either from Lyakhovichi or Baranovichi. The 6 with a Lyakhovichi notation have an L next to their year of birth. Everyone else was marked as of Baranovichi in "the BSSR" or "Belarussia." Go to the actual records and look at the cards and as you find additional info we can use, please share it!

SURNAME

FIRST NAME

PATRY.

Birth Year

BUDOVLIA

Khaim

Vol'fovich

1895L

GOL'DSHTEIN

Leiba

Efroimovich 

1920L

KONTOROVICH  

Vol'f

Shlemovich 

1923L

MALLOVITSKII

Fanvel'

Girshovich 

1887L

PENCHUK

Iosif

Evnovich

1924L 

ZELIKOVICH

Aron

Abramovich 

1906L

ABRAMOVICH

Pinia

Vol'fovich 

1908

ABRAMOVICH

Khaim

Zavelovich

1925 

AINSHTEIN

Rakhil'

Kheskelev 

1919

AIZINBERG

Liza

Leibovna 

1913

ANDIROV

Vladimir

Mikhailovich 

1907

BAUMS

Maks

Abramovich

BELIAVSKII

Zelik

Shlemovich

1922 

BOROVSKII

  Iona

Bordukhovich 

1921

BOZOSOLOD

Abram

Zalmanovich

1921

CHERNIKHOVA

Ginda

Samuilovna

1910 

CHERNYI

Gersh

Davidovich

1920

CHERNYI

Aron

Davidovich

1922

DAREVSKAIA  

Fruma

Sam

DRATEV

Rakhilia

Marovna 

1910 

DRATVA

Ber

Mairovich

1913

DRATVA

Khana

Abramovna

1918

DUSHATSKAIA

Polina

Moiseyevna

1914

DVORETSKAIA

Khasia

Peisalovna

1911

DVORETSKAIA

Gadasa

Iosifovna

1911

DVORETSKII

Lipa

Shmuilovich

1911

DVORINA

 Khasia

Peisolovna

1911

EMERT

Sema

Semnovich 

1910

ENGEL'MAN

Nadezhda

Shleyevna

1919 

EPSHTEIN

Noakh

Iakobovich 

1917 

EPSHTEIN

Tat'iana

Naumovna 

1914

FAIN

Khonon

Vol'fovich 

1897

FISHZON

Moisei

Meyerovich 

1908

FUKSAN'

Revekka

Izrailovna 

1920

FURMANOVICH

Izrail

Shimonovich

1901

FURMANOVICH

 Liia

Borisovna

1899

GAM

Samuil

Isaakovich

1920 

GLATSER

Roza

Vol'fovna

1916

GLATSER  

Libert

Leibovich 

1919

GOL'DSHTEIN

Reveka

Shmulevna 

1916

GOL'DSHTEIN

Felia

Shmulevna

1912 

GREBLIA  

Iudel''

El'yevich

1923 

GRINSHPAN

Abram

Avezelevich 

1914

GRINSHPAN  

Khaim

Avezelevich

1919 

IARAKHOVICH  

Ignat

Makeyevich

1915

IGALOVA  

Sonia

“V”

1914

IGOLOV  

Z

“V”

1919 

IKHCHENKO  

Roza

Iakovlevna 

1917 

ISAKOVA  

Ida

Grigor'yevna 

1900 

IUDASEVICH  

Bunia

“N”

1923 

IUDELEVICH  

Bunia

Abramovich 

1923 

KACHINSKII  

Iakov

Efimovich 

1910 

KARAMITSKII  

Mordukh

Bevsokhovich

1891

KARSHMAN  

Isel'

Itskovich 

1912 

KATENSKII  

Il'ia

Zelisovich 

1924 

KAZAKOVA  

Sof'ia

Andreyevna 

1894 

KHAIMOVICH

Vul'f

Zelikovich 

1905 

KHIMCHURIN

Efr

Shaev 

1924 

KIRMAN

Maia

Davidovna 

1903 

KIRZHNER  

Anatolii

Khaimovich 

1920 

KIVELEVICH  

Ruvim

Moiseyevich 

1922 

KIVILEVICH  

Rubin

Moiseyevich 

1922 

KLEINBARD  

Belianin

Girshovich 

1912 

KLEINER  

Faia

Evseyevna 

1907 

KONKOL'  

Leizer

Shlemovich 

1923 

KOZLOVITSKAIA  

Iudes

Iokhimovna 

1917 

KOZLOVITSKII  

David

Iokhil'yevich 

1921

LANUSVITSKII  

Mikhail

Iosifovich 

 

LINDAVEIS  

Pinkos

Berukhovich 

1912 

LINDVEIS  

Reisa

Ponausovna 

1914 

LISNER  

El'

Iosifovna 

1916 

LISNER  

Ester

Genokhurna 

1916 

LIVSHITS  

Gersh

Mendelevich 

1892 

LIVSHITS  

Dvoira

Letovna 

1903 

LURMAN  

Noyekh

Shnovich 

1912 

LURMAN  

Luba

Nokhomovna 

1912 

LURMAN  

Khaim

Shmulovich 

1919 

MARGULIS  

Polina

Markovna 

1913 

MATLIN  

Avraam

 

1906 

MATLOVSKII  

Moisei

Nokhimovich 

1920 

MIKHAILENKO  

Mariia

Isaakovna 

1913 

MISKII  

David

Gershovich 

1893 

MISKII  

Abram

Davidovich 

1920 

MISKIN  

Abram

Gdalevich 

1910 

MOPTSARZH  

Khami

Iankelevich 

1902 

MOROZ  

Arkadii

Stepanovich 

1908 

NENTSEL'  

Veivakh

Mordukhovich 

1919 

NENTSEL'  

Rubin

Mordukhovich 

1922 

NESVIZHSKII  

Zelik

Izrailevich 

1919 

NESVIZHSKII  

Mozm'

Izrailevich 

1913 

NIDEL  

Naum

Iosifovich 

1900 

PALUBA  

Abram

Zel'monovich 

1916 

PAVER  

Meyer

Abramovich 

1910 

PEREL'SHTEIN  

Tamara

Itmanovna 

1923 

PEREL'SHTEIN  

Sh

Iudelevich 

1895 

PETROMAN  

Mikhail

 

1910 

POLIACHIK  

Ruvim

Khaimovich 

1895 

POLONSKII  

Moli

1920 

POSTAN  

Mira

Iakovlevna 

1920 

PRUSHAKSKAIA  

Mariia

Mikhailovna 

1913 

RABINOVICH  

Nison

Aizikovich 

1907 

RABINOVICH

 Khava

Lazarovna 

1891

RABINOVICH

 Khasna

Mordukhovna 

1912 

RAZHEVSKII  

Khaim

Moiseyevich 

1922 

ROL'NIK  

Abram

Gershevich 

1905 

RUDENKOV  

Beniamin

Solomonovich 

1920 

RUDENKOV  

Iokhel'

Solomonovich 

1924 

RUSHIISKAIA  

Khaia

Leizerovna 

1914 

SAMSONOVA  

Lieba

Antonovna 

1895 

SHEMOVSKAIA  

AnnaKhasia

Volfovna 

1913 

SHENITSKII  

Rafail

Borukhovich 

1920 

SHIF  

Nison

Moiseyevich 

1909 

SHKLIAR

 Khana

Shevel'yevna 

1920 

SHKLIAR  

Abram

Shevel'yevich 

1923 

SHKLIAR  

Issak

Iusilevich 

1924 

SHOL'MAN   a

Soni

Lazarevna 

1901

SHOLOMOVICH  

Bonia

Mikhel's 

1908 

SHPIGEL'GLAS  

Khaskel'

Mailin 

1921

SHTRAUBAUM  

Khanna

Mirovna 

1907 

SHUSTER

 Rakhil'

Isakovna 

1924 

SHUSTER  

Khana

Gilelevna 

1898 

SHUSTER  

Aron

Isakovich 

1921

SHUSTER  

Isak

Mikhailovich 

1892 

SHUSTROVA  

Fania

Ivanovsk 

12l 

SHUSTROVA  

Fania

Ivanovna 

12l 

SINIAVSKII  

Leva

Isakovich 

1916 

SLUTSKII  

Mordukh

Solomonovich 

1905 

SOKHACHEVSKII  

Shaia

Itskovich 

1916 

SOLODUKH  

Iosif

Abramovich 

1912 

SOLOV'YEVA  

Nelia

Adamovna 

1896 

STAL'BERG

 S

Shlemovna 

1878 

SURGAL  

Iosif

Iakubovich 

1912 

SURGAL  

Abram

Iakubovich 

1901

SURGAL

 Simon

Iakubovich 

1905 

TURETSKII

 Ruvim

Davidovich 

1920 

VAIL'  

Anna

Markovna 

1901

VENTINSKII

Kolia

Samsonovich 

1916 

VISHNIA

 Abram

Iudelevich 

1923 

VOL'FSON

 Veniamin

Solomonovich 

1925 

VOZOTINSKII

 Freiko

Avrumovich 

1908 

ZABAVA

 Ekaterina

Ivanovna 

1906 

ZATENENSKAIA  

Rokhlia

Garkhovna 

1909 

ZEL'MAN  

Abram

Lazarevich 

1912 

ZHUKHOVITSKAIA

 Gata

Iukelevna 

1901

ZHUKHOVITSKII  

Aron

Iudeleyevich 

1893 

ZLINER  

Iasha

Iosifovich 

1932