Creating a resource for collaborative research
on the history of the Jewish community
in what is today Lyakhovichi, Belarus    

ShtetLinks

Shtetl Links: Lyakhovichi

 

Home Contact
 




Key Pages
Indices
Welcome
Documents
Photos
Biographies
Collections
Geography
History
Terms of Use
Copyright Info

NAVIGATION

Home
Contact Us!
JewishGen

Belarus SIG

ShtetLinks

This site is created as a way to further research and publication of materials on the history of Lyakhovichi.If you have been aided in your research and wish to contribute materials and resources to further our knowledge, contact Gary Palgon and ask how you can help.

This site is hosted at no cost by JewishGen, Inc., the Home of Jewish Genealogy. If you have been aided in your research by this site and wish to further our mission of preserving our history for future generations, your JewishGen-erosity is greatly appreciated.


Street and Business Guides to Lyakhovichi and its surrounding communities

This is a page in our Documents category to see other material in this section, click the "Documents" button in the left-hand column.

There are currently 3 Directory pages on this site.

Directories of Lyakhovichi - Russian Empire Period You are Here

Directories of Lyakhovichi - Polish Republic Period

New July 2009 Directories of Lyakhovichi - Trade and Professional. Currently includes information about Lyakhovichi and Baranovichi midwives in the Polish period. Will be adding Lawyers and Doctors in next update

Using Lyakhovichi City Directories
by Deborah Glassman, copyright 2007

There are several different kinds of published materials that are brought together under the umbrella heading of "city directories." They include street directories that list every resident of a block; business directories that report specific businesses in an entire community; trade directories that provide credit information on businesses in a region; postal and telephone directories that provide lists of households registered to receive mail or telephone service; and others. Historical researchers can use these materials more effectively by recognizing the particular assets and flaws of each type as well as by participating in collaborative efforts to better identify the resources available.

Business directories for Lyakhovichi allow you to see a specific set of commercial operations in a "snapshot" taken the year the directory was compiled. They show you the form of personal name by which the merchant was known to his customers and colleagues. They can give you an idea of the business environment in which he/she functioned – how many competitors, how far away from the competition, and what kind of services were described. If two directories cover a time period a few years apart, you may be able to identify when a business was started, changed, or transfered to a family member. Lyakhovichi business directories do not list every business owner, a wide variety of businesses were excluded. Non-included enterprises included itinerant peddlers, operators of market stands, providers of personal services, and many businesses that operated from a front room of a residence. If the subject of your research was a tailor, or she bought and resold produce from a stand, or was a salesman who called on customers in their homes, you will not find them in the directories created in the Russian Empire (before 1918). If your family included teachers, pharmacists in hospitals, small scale truckers or mechanics, you may not find them in the directories of Poland (1920-1939) either. In neither of these periods will you find your relatives if they operated without a fixed place of business, if they were retired, or if they were not the primary operator of the business. Lyakhovichi's business directories, unlike street or telephone directories, are not a good source of data on when a newcomer first arrived in the community, but they do work as a way to gather information on when a business last shows up in the records. Unfortunately there seems to be a fairly substantial carry over of names from one year to the next regardless of change of circumstance. We find people who we know emigrated in 1928 still appearing in the 1930 collation and for at least one man, we find him in three subsequent directories to the year of his death. Still, this may reflect a business continuing to be operated by other family members and an address tied to a family residence rather than a business. For more details, see the specific list of Business Directories from which we share images and extracted information, below.

Telephone Directories listed every house and business with a telephone, alphabetically by the name of the head of household or business owner. The numbers of individuals with their own telephones increased dramatically in the 1920s, and by the 1930s was fairly universal in Lyakhovichi even if not in the smallest outlying towns. Just as importantly, small businesses that would not show up in business directories, owned phones in this time period, which can be found under the business name or that of the householder. The telephone directory thus becomes the first directory available from non-government sources, to all of the heads of households in Lyakhovichi. If we can locate a few from different years, we will start to be able to analyze the creation of separate households, the effects of movement in and out of the town in the 1920s-30s, and more. The telephone company that covered Lyakhovichi and Baranovichi was PAST, which stood for Polska Akcyjna Spólka Telefoniczna which was a joint stock company largely controlled by Cedergren, an ancestor company of Ericsson of Sweden. The 1939 Warsaw Directory from this firm shows a hub and switching station in Baranowicze. We are actively looking for telephone directories that include the towns immediately around Baranowicze from this firm from anytime between 1920 and 1939. Can you help?

Trade Directories listed certain types of business along with appropriate credit information. An English publisher, Eyre of London, published a series they called "Russian Year Books" annually from 1911-1915, having collected the last information in 1914 before World War I began. It lists banks, insurance companies, shipping agents, and a great deal more in its first more than 700 page book, working down to around 400 pages the last year. Minsk gubernia is well represented, and I have identified a copy from which to extract information for the next update. Eyre Spotswood Russian Year Book 1911 - available at the Free Library of Philadelphia. Credit bureaus; Chambers of Trade and Commerce; and industry-specific publications published materials on the health and activity of the commercial sphere in Russia; in the Russian Empire's "northwest provinces" and Minsk guberniya; in the Novogrodek powiat of the new nation of Poland; and more. The 1923 Directory listed below, was published by an organization that provided informational services to banks, insurance underwriters, and foreign merchants. They called themselves the "Trade Intelligence Bureau of Poland-Danzig" and advertised that it could provide from its files, information on "any business in Poland." Perhaps someone who studies business or economics, will be able to steer us to records of this firm or to similar companies. Maybe someone will know of records of the groups this publication distinguished as "Chambers of Commerce," "Chambers of Trade." "Chambers of Agriculture," etc. Those organizations supplied services and information to their members and to their customers. The majority of the companies that they would have known about, would not have been Jewish businesses but we must have had a presence. The large number of Jewish businesses that might be included would have included few from Novogrodskie powiat, but those that made it into the files may have illuminated others. We continue to seek out specific materials that would include Lyakhovichi and would like your help at identifying them. These are not all of the directories that covered businesses and residents in this community, but they are the total of what we have so far located. Others will turn up in bookstores, on ebay, and in the storage sheds of people you visit abroad. More will be posted online as libraries and archives avail themselves of digitizing services and Search Engine utilization. Our website's information includes extractions made by the webmaster from the following directories (working backwards through the Twentieth Century): The Poland and Danzig Directories [more properly titled "Ksiega Adresowa Polski (Wraz z w.m. Gdanskiem) dla Handlu, Przemyslu, Rzemiosl i Rolnictwa"] of 1930, 1929, 1928, and 1927-1926. The Poland and Danzig Directory of 1923, which did not have a listing for individual towns in Novogrodskie powiat, was examined to determine if any Lyakhovichi firm had a national presence. The five year run of Lyakhovichi business directories gives us a unique opportunity to correlate these records with other sources that our individual researchers can bring to our research effort. We offer the images as well as the extracted information on these pages.

These books have been located, digitized, translated, and indexed or accessed at great effort by very diligent people working as volunteers for different organizations, Logan Kleinwaks created a Search Engine for Online Historical Directories in which he uses optical character recognition software to search a series of wonderful resources, including the 1926/1927 edition of the Polish-Danzig directory located online at Digital Library of Wielkopolska on 2626 pages. While I decided to take a fresh look at Lyakhovichi in these directories using the images as our source, I still have to salute the the hard work of Ellen Sadove Renck who indexed for the benefit of JewishGen at large, the 1929 Directory’s 15,000 name Nowogrodskie powiat. The JRI of Poland, hosted on JewishGen.org, has made that same directory available in digitized images and in a database of towns.

A review of directories from different years gives you a much more in depth look at the lives of your ancestors. For instance, the 305 people who were listed as businessmen in 1929 (excluding nine more listed as landowners) are interesting in their own right but also as a look at a business community that had numbered just 134 people in 1926 (again excluding the six landowners of that year.) One hundred and seventy people were newly engaged in commerce, artisanry, and professional occupations, in 1929 that had not been recorded just three years earlier.

Some of the reasons can be traced to demographics. Lyakhovichi had lost a tremendous piece of its population in emigration to the United States between 1890 and 1910. A whole generation of people in their twenties and thirties had left their small town and it looked for a long time as if it would not recover. But the population of what is now Belarus was recovering in the 1920s and 1930s, and young people who had come of age as World War I was beginning, in-progress, or just ended, did not have the outlet of emigration to the United States. Some would still leave and head to Eretz Israel, Mexico, Argentina, and Cuba, but many were determined to make a life for themselves in modern Poland.

There were five new bakeries, four new cafes, and a restaurant in Lyakhovichi in just the three years between the publishing of the 1926 and the 1929 Directories. There were no cattle-traders or horse-traders in 1926 but in 1929 Jews had started eight different businesses in these fields and most in the form of partnerships or companies. Two butchers' names disappear but the total number went up; a capmaker is exchanged one-for-one with a newcomer. Some businesses had been expanded: one kitchenware purveyor is gone but a man formerly listed just under tinware is now listed under kitchenware, as well. There are two new doctors though the one there previously has gone; there are dentists where there were none before. We don't yet know the dynamics that caused fabric manufacturers to jump from 6 to 19, perhaps we will find that factories have been started in this time period. Service businesses like groceries seem to have grown immensely: 52 separate grocers are listed in 1929 where there were 19 in 1926; while artisans whose trade required training, stayed relatively constant -the numbers of shoemakers were eleven in 1929, ten in 1926.

Not all of the books are equal in coverage. The value of the 1926 through 1930 Poland-Danzig Directories is that they have detailed listings by each of Poland's eleven powiats, including the one for Nowogrodek where Lyakhovichi was positioned. See the growth between the 130+ in "Lachowicze" miasteczko and gmina (community and larger community) from the 1926 directory and the 300+ recorded for those same miasteczko and gmina in 1929. The additional years of 1927, 1928, and 1930 ,that we have since added, show the climb continued steadily. The earliest years of the worldwide Depression showed more businesses not less, as families put more members to work in small businesses to make ends meet. The 1923 Poland-Danzig Directory lacks severely in comparison to every subsequent year, it is a business directory, but not divided by powiats, so a company has to have a national presence to make it into the publication. It was designed for a national and international market so 1923 was printed in five languages (Polish, French, German, English, Ukrainian, and Russian). So far, its greatest value to Lyakhovichi research has been its nice map that includes Lyakovichi and the local transportation routes, which appears on our "Maps" page. But as an overall commercial directory on the national level, no Lyakhovichi or even Baranovichi, businesses seem to make it into its listing, though I will continue searching.

You saw that we mentioned books from the Russian period, the Russian Year Books of 1911-1915. Economic libraries might be able to shed some light on the kinds of information that was published in this time period and still available. In the United States, in the 1890s through 1910s, there was a flourishing business in credit information about merchants of all kinds - fruit and produce buyers; jewelers; contractors; et al. There are credit directories for towns all over the United States, which gave a clear picture of most businessmen in the town. Sioux City Iowa, that magnet of townsmen from the Kopyl area including our Lyakhovichi, still has a Dun-and-Bradstreet's-predecessor report from 1902 and 1920, for example. Perhaps we will find similar items in the Russian Empire.

Providing "modern business information" was the thought behind the "Vsia Rossia" -the All Russian Directories - printed in Russia from at least 1895. The 1903 and 1911 entries for Lyakhovichi from the All Russian Directories were extracted by the Lyakhovichi special interest group and donated to Jewishgen sometime back. This material, on microfilm at the Library of Congress and in book form at a very few libraries, needs to be re-examined. First, we would like to post the actual page images, especially as the deterioration of the microfilm has led to some legibility issues. More eyes on the problem could get more good ideas into play and some specific questions could be resolved. Why, for instance, are there zero tobacco sellers in Lyakhovichi's businesses in 1911 and 29 in nearby Baranovichi? Why do twenty plus grocerykeepers in Baranovichi get listed with a second business of tobacco sales and five get listed with a secondary business of flour sales but Lyakhovichi grocery owners are not noted with secondary enterprises? But even our two business directories, eight years apart, have some special value being in reasonable time proximity to each other. There are some businesses that may have transferred from one family member to another - we have three pharmacies in 1903, six in 1911. Two of the three pharmacies are owned by people with the same surname as in 1903 but a different first name. One of the new pharmacies is operated by a woman, - did she buy from a previous owner, start a new business among five competitors, or inherit from the third person who owned one in 1903? Baranovichi, while a large substantial settlement in 1911, is virtually non-existent in 1903. Its name does not appear except as the township for Novo Mysh. We find three business owners being described as "of Novo Mysh in Baranovichi." But in 1911, we find some who were in Lyakhovichi in 1903, operating in Baranovichi in 1911. We have at least one enterprising miller, Yosef Busel, operating flour mills in both towns that year. Towns that are later described as dependents of Baranovichi like Gorodysche have a large number of their own businesses in this time period, while Baranovichi is still getting its feet under itself.

Click to see all the names in the list of Businesses in Lyakhovichi 1926-1930 and in Surrounding Towns in the year 1929

Then look at a very different kind of source on Lyakhovichi Businesses before World War I. The Lyakhovichi Yizkor book is not simply a remembrance of those who were murdered by the Nazis, but a look at the world of the Jews of Lyakhovichi, which was lost in the terror. Many of the people writing about the small town in which they first lived, were writing about a place they last saw decades previous. One of the writers, Avrom Lev, wrote a nostalgic look at the town of Lyakhovichi. He found it easiest to describe in the terms of a "walking tour." The format, which was clearly a memorial to the many individuals he had cherished in his youth, became a kind of cross between a travel guide, a street directory, and a tribute to individuals who, for good and bad, filled his memories of Lyakhovichi. Dr. Neville Lamdan created a moving translation which you will see at A Walk through my Devastated Shtetl.
Dr. Lamdan went on to create an index of the over 220 people named by name or nickname in his important contribution to the translation of Lyakhovichi's Yiskor book. That index can be found at the end of his translation. It lists all of the people named, with and without surnames, and the index alone, is a great new asset for researchers.

The list below was created separately by the webmaster for a different purpose - it is a look at the town by street and house description and the business or residence of the occupant. Additional surnames that were able to be identified were attached to some who had been referred to by Avrom Lev, only with nicknames. Many people named in the article are not named here because they do not have an occupation or residence in the town (like children who moved away: people named only as love interests; and those whose place in the author's memory was earned by fashion, zeal of prayer, or ability to swim). Read the article for an unforgettable glimpse of our town's life, because the list below has had that life squeezed out of it to get a simple street and business directory from what was an articulate and moving memoir.

A Street Guide to Lyakhovichi Businesses and Residences Pre WWI
By street in their order geographically
extracted from A Walk through my Devastated Shtetl

NAME

Business or Residence Description

Street Name or Location

ROSZOVSKY, Shloime

Shloimke Rozovsky is one of shop owners on Abraham Yankel Kaplan’s first floor

Market Place is at the east end of town. In the Market Place, two storied stone house of Abraham Yankel Kaplan with row of stores on first floor

COHEN, Itsche and his wife Nehama Raisels

An inn in the center of the city, Nehama Raisels Inn, (called before WWI by her husband’s name Reb Itsche Cohen) (Jewish clientele, primarily)

Market Place, the second two storied stone house; of Reb Itsche Cohen and his wife Nechama Raisels – an inn. Appears in 1905 property register for Lyakhovichi under the name Itsko Kagan.

 

Cabs and Drivers tied up at Nehama Raisels Inn

Market Place, the second two storied stone house; of Reb Itsche Cohen and his wife Nechama Raisels – an inn

MISHKOFSKY, Israel

Legal advocate; scribe

Market Place, the third two storied stone house of Israel Mishkofsky; with state Liquor store on first floor (Monopol) and Israel Mishkovsky’s legal advice and scribal office on 2 nd floor. He is listed in the 1905 Property records as Srol, son of Girsh Myshkovskiy, owner of a stone building with the state wine shop. In 1874 Mishkofsky was living in his father's apartment on Klteskaya Street.

(EPSTEIN) aka Michael AGUSHKES, Michael Agushe, Michael Dodes; named also father Dode, son Dode, son's wife Temma, and the children of Dode and Temme - a son Meirke, a daughter Hode

Inn / Hotel – modern with many Christian guests including noblemen

Market Place, the fourth building seeming to continue Israel Mishkofsly’s house, the hotel of Michael Dodes aka Michael Agushkes. (modern hotel, Christian guests) In the 1905 Lyakhovichi property records he is called Michael son of Dovid EPSTEIN and the building is said to rent "furnished apartments" in our translation. He is recorded owning that building since 1874. It is presumed that his co-name Agushkes is from his wife's name

(EPSTEIN) aka Dode (nickname for David) son of Michael Agushkes with his father Michael, his wife Temma, and the children of Dode and Temme - a son Meirke, a daughter Hode

Inn / Hotel – modern with many Christian guests including noblemen

Market Place, the fourth building seeming to continue Israel Mishkofsly’s house, the hotel of Michael Dodes aka Michael Agushkes. (modern hotel, Christian guests) In the 1905 Lyakhovichi property records he and his father are both listed and the building is said to rent "furnished apartments" in our translation. His father appears to own that same building since 1874. It is presumed that his father's co-name Agushkes is from his wife's name, but Dode's mother is not reported

(EPSTEIN) AGUSHE, Meirke son of Michael and Temma, died during WWI. No surname on page.

Graduate of Optician school; came home from big city on holidays

Market Place

MONYE, Idel (aka MEINISH, Idel) no last name appears to be present

Building description

Market Place, the fifth two storied stone building. After his death, a cooperative bank was upstairs, and on the first floor a road house (pub/inn)

ALEZAR, Peretz this may not be a last name but a formation from a father's name of Leizar

Tailor shop

Market Place, a wood building against Idel Monye’s building, Peretz Alezar’s tailor shop – not far from the Agushe stone house (Dodes Inn)

 

Building description

Market Place, the shared building of Reb Leibe Kantorovich and Reb Yosef Bogin – the Kantorovcih sided served as Stoliner Shul, the Bogin side as Flour warehouse. Bogin appears in the 1905 property register of Lyakhovichi with this flour warehouse.

KANTOROVICH, Leibe

Owner of building

Market Place

NO SURNAME GIVEN Yitzhak Aron

Cheder teacher

Market Place

BOGIN, Yosef

Flour Merchant (links with largest flour companies in Russia)

Founded a modern cheder.

Market Place, the shared building of Reb Leibe Kantorovich and Reb Yosef Bogin – the Kantorovcih sided served as Stoliner Shul, the Bogin side as Flour warehouse

NO SURNAME GIVEN Riva the widow (see also Shaindel POSTAN)

Soda shop

Market Place, the small shop below the Kantorovich-Bogin Building

POSTAN, Shaindel daughter of Riva the widow, with Berl Postan her husband

Soda shop

Market Place, the small shop below the Kantorovich-Bogin Building

MALOWITSKY, Michael Noah (listed on page as Michl Noah, no surname, but it names his children)

Building Description

Market Place – making a right at Bogin-Kantorovich house. There is in the 1905 Property register a Noah Malovitsky who owns property on Market place, 4 wooden buildings including a warehouse. He lives next door to an Abram Malovitsky who is called Abram son of Mikhel. But the names Michael Malovitsky and Noah Malovitsky repeat in this family and parties are easily confused.

MALOWITSKY, Abram

Building description

Market Place, next to Michael Noah Malowitsky (who is next to Bogin-Kantorovich) a small house adjoining Michael Noah’s house. An Abram Malowitsky son of Michael is listed in 1905 Registry of Property in Lyakhovichi owning property on Market Place.

VINOGRAD, Shlomo aka Reb Shlomo Feivels (brother of Boaz Vinograd)

Merchants of wax, pig bristle, and wood whose shipments went abroad as far as America.

Market Place, near Michael Noah Malowitsky’s house [??] is 2 story stone house of Vinograd family. Merchants of wax, pig bristle, and wood.

VINOGRAD, Gitel daughter of Shlomo Feivels

 

Market Place

VINOGRAD, Yitzhak son of Shlomo Feivels

 

Market Place

VINOGRAD, Boaz (brother of Shlomo Feivels)

Merchants of wax, pig bristle, and wood whose shipments went abroad as far as America.

Market Place, near Michael Noah Malowitsky’s house [??] is 2 story stone house of Vinograd family. Merchants of wax, pig bristle, and wood.

(TUKACHINSKY) SHAIYEL, Nechemyah aka Reb Cheme and his wife Bashe

cobbler (shoemaker) supplies

Market Place near Vinograd house, a little wooden house with store on market side and dwelling in rear. The only Nechemya found in the 1905 Registry of Property Owners, on Market Street, and also owning a wooden house with small shop was Nechemya TUCKACHINSKY. He had owned it from the 1880s and that Nechemya Tukachinsky lived near property owned by his brother Mordechai on Market Place, which corresponds to Nechemya Shaiyel's brother Mordechai Shaiyel. It turns out that the 1884 tax list identifies each of them with the patronymic of Shevel which is here called Shaiyel and the author went on to describe Mordechai's children in ways that exactly match Mordechai Shevelovich Tuckachinsky - "a son in Shanghai" a dtr Broche murdered by the Nazis."

(TUKACHINSKY) SHAIYEL, Mordechai (brother of Nechemya)

Merchant and head of “Community Chest”

Market Place, single story stone house. Mordechai Shaiyel aka Mordechai b Shevel Tukachinsky is described with "a son in Shanghai" a dtr Broche murdered by the Nazis" which matches Nisan Tuckachinsky and his sister.

CHAZANOVICH, Yehoshua

Building owner

Market Place, stone house owned by Yehoshua and after his death by son Moshke. [ Ovsey Chazanovich owns a stone building on Market Place that houses a tavern in the 1905 Lyakhovichi property register. Ovsey is interchangeable with Govsey, and is a nickname for Joshua. - DGG]

CHAZANOVICH, Moshke son of Yehoshua

Buidling owner

Market Place, stone house owned by Yehoshua and after his death by son Moshke

PELZEL, Leibe (Pelzel is probably his occupation rather than surname) also lists his sons Yona and Yankel and calls them cousins to kibutzhik Yosel Busel

furrier

Market Place, stone house owned by Leibe Pelzel (the furrier)

BERKOVICH, Shimmel

Buidling owner

Market Place, the long courtyard of the brothers Shimmel and Berl Berkovich. Shimshel son of Borukh BERKOVICH and Berko son of Borukh BERKOVICH are shown as owning this building in 1905 following a previous ownership by Borukh son of Sholom BErkovich in the Lyakhovichi Property Records. A business on the property mentioned in those records was a beeswax shop.

BERKOVICH, Berl

Buidling owner

Market Place, the long courtyard of the brothers Shimmel and Berl Berkovich

BERKOVICH, Malke

resident

Market Place

Botche der Hoicher (the Tall)

Merchant, with business abroad

Market Place

MALAVITSKY

Merchants of pelts and wood

Market Place

Libe der Geller (the Redhead) with her son Lippe

Codfish shop run by the wife while husband works in Crimea (comes home at Pesach and High Holydays)

Market Place; Little house with tiny shop in front

KARELICH, Zundel Gedalyos

Melamed, scholar

Market Place -His wife had tailor shop at Market Place street corner, and he had a stall at “Between the Shops”

KARELICH, Tzippe (wife of Zundel Gedalyos)

Tailor shop

Market Place; on the street-corner

KARELICH, Dr. Yudel. Son of Zundel and Tzippe Karelich did not live in town as adult.

Physician – only visited in Lyakhovichi

Market Place

GAVZE, Pinye

Pelt merchant, lost his livelihood

Market Place, on the corner opposite the Karelich’s – an intersecting street?

Leibel Avrom-Yitzhak’s

Shop – not specified

Market Place: Near Pinya Gavze’s house

KURCHIN family - residence

Building description

Market Place – two houses same lot of Kurchin and Churgin families inherited by children from their fathers. In 1905 Faivel and Aron Kurhin owned a wooden house together on Market Place.

CHURGIN family - residence

Building description

Market Place – two houses same lot of Kurchin and Churgin families inherited by children from their fathers.

CHURGIN, Faye

Graduate of “Froebelist” teaching school of Yechiel Halpern in Warsaw

Market Place – two houses same lot of Kurchin and Churgin families inherited by children from their fathers.

WEINER, Yankele Shmuel

Bookbinder, worked for Sander der Ainbinder

Market Place

GANTSEVICH, Sander "der Ainbinder" (last name not given on page)

Bookbinder

Market Place, house and business of the bookbinder. In 1905 Lyakhovichi property register, Sender Gantsevich a bookbinder, owns a wooden building in common with Yossel Birger in Market Place, and it contains a confectionary shop and a bookbinder shop.

KAPEL, Rochel

Sold pastry

Not at a fixed location, in meetings and businesses

Sore Kalman-Yosels (wife of Zerach)

Café – soda, cookies and ice-cream

Market Place.

GAVZE, Alter

Manufactures glue

Market Place

MALEVITZKY, Yosel

Wood merchant

Market Place Next to Gavze in the second house

Moshe the Printer and son Nyome (Benjamin)

Prints documents and dyes peasant women’s blouses

Market Place “over there” is Moshe the Printer’s house

DITKOWSKY, Pesach aka Pesach Hinde Reizel’s

Merchant

Market Place -A little turn to the right and are standing next to Pesach’s house. In the 1905 Property registry his wooden house on Market Place is mentioned, no patronymic included.

DITKOWSKY, Hinde Reizel’s

pelt shop

Market Place -A little turn to the right and are standing next to Pesach’s house

Gershon the shoemaker

Location not given, customer of DITKOWSKY

ng

BREVDA, Aharon-Itshe

Brewery

Market Place Large house with brewery in yard

ROZOVSKY, Bayrech

goldsmith

Market Place; A low house

ROZOVSKY, Sore, wife of Bayrich

Jewlery store

Market Place

PINSKY, Rabbi Zalman Yitzhak with son Gedalyo

Building description

Market Place – not far from Rozovsky. He appears in 1902 Property Register with property on Market Square.

PINSKY, Aron Nisel

Bookeeper in Bank and operated a book store and library

Market Place – not far from Rozovsky, a second market home

MILETZKY, Gedalyo

merchant

Market Place -2 story wooden house with a manufacturing business below and his apartment in the courtyard

MILETSKY, Frumke aka Frume Naftolke’s, sister of Gedalyo Miletsky

Colonial business – a local name for a store selling drygoods and high-end merchandise from the Russian provinces

Renskovoy Pogrev” was the name of the business

Market Place - 2 story house

VARSHAL, Moshke aka Moshke Chayim Ber

Beer brewery

Market Place -Yard with brewery deep in the yard; big house big extended family. Avrom Lev refers to Varshal as Moshke Chayim Ber. There was a Hayim son of Yoel Varshal who owned this property in the 1870s. There was a Moshe son of Hayim who owned it in 1885. Perla dtr of Joseph, who appears in the 1903 Directory as a seller of beer-honey, may have been someone's wife or widow. she is listed in the 1905 Lyakhovichi property registry as the owner of the brewery on Market Place.

BUSEL, Stirl
called on the page, Stirl der Kezeles (nickname and translation of Esther of the little cheeses) wife of Noah Leib (called sister of Broche wife of Yitzhak Yosel who had a cheese business in Riyadn street [Rejtan?]

Cheesemaker, seller of hard cheeses, cheese dumplings, fresh butter, and candles made by her husband

Market Place -Shop of Stirl der Kezeles

BUSEL, Noah Leib called on the page Noah Leib, husband of Stirl der Kezeles

Candlemaker

Market Place - 2 story house

BREVDA, Alter

photographer

Market Place -A “half” single story stone house with stairs in front and glass building in yard that is photography studio

BREVDA, parents of Levi Ben-Amittai (ne Lipa BREVDA)

residents

Market Place -A “half” single story stone house with stairs in front and glass building in yard that is photography studio; the parents of Israeli poet Levi Ben-Amittai live in the house. Ben-Amittai's real name was Lipa Brevda and in 1905 the property was owned by the heirs of Srol son of Itska BREVDA according to the Lyakhovichi property records. In 1905 it already included the photography studio that was owned by Alter (Mordechai Gershon) Brevda.

GELLIN, Yehudo

Credit Merchants, partners Yehudo Gellin and Nachmen Levin

Market Place -Lemtschich’s 2 story stone house with broad and shady entrance. The bankers live on seond floor

LEVIN, Nachman

Credit Merchants, partners Yehudo Gellin and Nachmen Levin

Market Place -Lemtschich’s 2 story stone house with broad and shady entrance. The bankers, their children and married children, live on seond floor

SOLOVEICHIK,son-in-law of Credit Merchants (one of Yehudo Gellin or Nachman Levin) of the family of the Brisker Gaon, Chayimke Soloveichik

Credit merchant?

Market Place -Lemtschich’s 2 story stone house with broad and shady entrance. The bankers, their children and married children, live on seond floor

LEMTSCHICH family

Building Description

Market Place -Lemtschich’s 2 story stone house with broad and shady entrance. The Lemtschich’s live on the first floor. (presumably the bar is there)

Mrs. LEMTSCHICH

Bar for teamsters and policemen

Market Place -Lemtschich’s 2 story stone house with broad and shady entrance. The Lemtschich’s live on the first floor. (presumably the bar is there)

Mottel the Tinsmith, der Blecher

Tinsmith

Market Place -Mottel der Blecher’s fine house – the credit merchants had a banking counter in his house

BIRGER, Gedalya son of Yudel

brewery?lunchroom

Market Place - Not listed by Avrom Lev. Appears in 1905 Property register as the owner of a lunchroom in Market Place and in the 1903 Business Directory as the owner of a brewery in Lyakhovichi. The building was made of wood and it was not his primary residence as he lived on Tatarskaya Street in a home owned by his brother.

GOLDBERG, Girsh Leib

tavern

Market Place - Not listed by Avrom Lev. Appears in 1905 Property register as the owner of a tavern in a stone building in Market Place. Previously it had been owned by Leiba GOLDBERG.

PINTSCHUK, Yitzhak Yosel with wife and son Yerucham

Colonial business – a local name for a store selling drygoods and high-end merchandise from the Russian provinces

Intersection of Riyadn Street and Market Place

RABINOVICH, Michael, son-in-law of Reb Avrom Yankev

Rabbi (called here “talmed chochim”)

Intersection of Riyadn Street – opposite Pintschuk’s colonial store

Shifretzke,

Seller of fruits and vegetables

Three Riyadn Stores (on Riyadn Street) “120 families made their livings here”

ZAYETZ, Nyome (Benjamin)

Built stone buildings for butchers on Riyadn Street; says elsewhere a building contractor with state contracts

Riyadn Street – stone stores and meat shops built by Nyome Zayetz to replace the former dirty wooden structures

Chaim Bashes

Colonial business – a local name for a store selling drygoods and high-end merchandise from the Russian provinces

Riyadn Street – stone stores

MOLOVITSKY, Alter aka Alter Bande,

Flour store

Riyadn Street – stone stores

Ittel wife of Zelig Shimel who was also called Zelig Ittels. Worked with her dtr Yocheved and her husband worked there sometimes

store sold staple groceries including sugar and tea

Riyadn Street – stone stores

BEDER, Broche called “Broche wife of Yitzhoch Yosel”and “sister of Stirl Noah-Leibe’s” on page

Dairy- Yitzhock Yosel’s dairy run by his wife: sold cheese, butter, cream cheese,

Riyadn Street to the right

BEDER, Yitzhak Yosef

Dairy

Riyadn Street to the right

-

Storekeepers dealing in flour

Granaries - The area called

Reichel the Bakerwoman

Concession selling cakes and breads

Granaries - The area called

Bashe the daughter of Reichel the Bakerwoman

Concession selling cakes and breads

Granaries - The area called

TZIMMERING, Shmuel-Dovid and wife Feige Dine. He owned store, she ran it

Little shop

Grainaries: To the right of

Reb Shaiye-Bere-Velvels

Store selling supplies to farmers.

 

Grainaries: To the left of the Tzimmerings are three or four stores selling supplies like wheelgrease, boot preservative, tobacco, kerosene, et al.

One shop belongs to Reb Shaiye-Bere-Velvel's and another to Reb Yayrshel-Borech-Meir's.

 

 

Reb Yayrshel-Borech-Meir's

Store selling supplies to farmers. Wealthiest man in town, all his sons and dtrs in business

 

Grainaries: To the left of the Tzimmerings are three or four stores selling supplies like wheelgrease, boot preservative, tobacco, kerosene, et al.

One shop belongs to Reb Shaiye-Bere-Velvel's and another to Reb Yayrshel-Borech-Meir's

1 or 2 Businesses whose owners are unaccounted for in this block

Store selling supplies to farmers.

Grainaries: To the left of the Tzimmerings are three or four stores selling supplies like wheelgrease, boot preservative, tobacco, kerosene, et al. (2 accounted for)

VAPNIK, Shimen

Little shop, not specified

“Between the Shops” two row of businesses, opposite each other. Starting one row with Shimen Vapnik’s shop and ending on other side with Yitzhkok Brevda’s [shipping?] business

BREVDA, Yitzchok

Shipping? (is the same Brevda who drove the stagecoach??)

“Between the Shops” two row of businesses, opposite each other. Starting one row with Shimen Vapnik’s shop and ending on other side with Yitzhkok Brevda’s [shipping?] business

DITKOVSKY, Hinde-Reizel

Leather business

“Between the Shops” two row of businesses, opposite each other. The second row starts with Hinde-Reizel Ditkovsky's leather business and ends with Reitze-Sore's shop with hatchets, axes, beads, and buttons

NO SURNAME GIVEN, Reitze-Sore

Notions and Sundries

“Between the Shops” two row of businesses, opposite each other. The second row starts with Hinde-Reizel Ditkovsky's leather business and ends with Reitze-Sore's shop with hatchets, axes, beads, and buttons

RATNER, Yosel

Runs Store while engaged in Torah studies

“Between the Shops”

RIVKIN, Shloime

Manufacturer; wealthy;

“Between the Shops”

Devoire Yaakov-Moishe’s

Haber-
dashery Shop

“Between the Shops”

LEV, (Surname not given on page) Rifka- Leah the widow, daughter of Reb Shaike the Dayen (names 12 people in her photograph) (the names of all of her children match those reported for the Lev family in Holocaust testimony including her son whose name is given in this source as Asher Lev)

Second store of Rivke-Leah

“Between the Shops”

Mendel the iron-worker (kalt-schmid)

Iron-worker

“Between the Shops”

RATNER, Ortsh’kel, the brother of Yosel Ratner and son of Etel-Gitl and Reb Noah

Small shop, he studied Torah

“Between the Shops”

RATNER, Etel-Gitl wife of Reb Noah

Small shop

“Between the Shops”

RATNER, Reb Noah

Melamed, from the description he seems to be deaf, but it is not clear if he is a teacher of the deaf

 

Reb Michael Kaile’s

Glass store: run by his wife and children while he teaches Advanced Talmud

“Between the Shops”

ALTVARG, Pesach

Tailor shop: run by his wife and children while he studies

“Between the Shops”

KARELICH, Zundel Gedalyos (page does not have surname)

Tailor shop: run by his wife

“Between the Shops”

VARSHAL, Avrom

storeowner

“Between the Shops”

KANTOROVICH, Aron-Leib

Business owner

Yener Zait Mark [“Market on the other Side”]. After the two rows of “Between the Shops”, we take a right to the shops of the (so-called) Yener Zait Mark

KANTOROVICH, Dine Rive wife of Aron Leib and mother of 12

Trades and travels to market fairs

Yener Zait Mark

Berl Michael Binyoninkas

Flour store

Yener Zait Mark

 

Boarded up Fire Brigade Shed

Open field of market between Market Place, and Yener Zait mark; Across the empty market field, near the pump

DITKOVSKY, Pesach

Corner house

The Rampart (Der Vall) – residential area

Asher derZeigermachter's (the watchmaker)

As the wall is before us, Asher’s home is to the right in an apple orchard

The Rampart (Der Vall) – residential area

Avrom'l Rasl's

As the wall is before us, Avroml Rasl’s home is to the left

The Rampart (Der Vall) – residential area. Possibly Abram Begun who lived on the Rampart from 1885.

Rasl wife of Avroml Rasls

As the wall is before us, Avroml Rasl’s home is to the left

The Rampart (Der Vall) – residential area

Gedalyo the Melamed

Next on the left is Gedlayo the Melamed’s house

The Rampart (Der Vall) – residential area. In 1905 Gedalya Elina (Jelin) received a house on this block, from his father Naftali son of Gedalya Elina. Also in 1905 Gedalya Goldberg lived in a stone house on this road.

RIVKIN, Shloime

And across it to the right is Shloime Rivkin’ fine house

The Rampart (Der Vall) – residential area

MILLER, the Chemist also called Miller the Polish Pharmacist

And over there is Miller’s chemist shop surrounded by a fruit orchard

The Rampart (Der Vall) – residential area

-

Street description

The Rampart (Der Vall) – residential area

The Hekdesh of Idel Mones

Further along the wall, the hospice built that has stood empty and become a Zionist meeting area

The Rampart (Der Vall) – residential area

for us the [Sanitarians] road became “ Main Street”. It was the street where our Lechovicher Jews went to stroll on Shabbes and holidays

 

Street description

“Sanitarians' Street: Going through the back alley, from the Rampart, we come out to where the Sanitarians Street” begins

It seems that even in mid-week this street [Sanitarians' Street or “ Main Street”] is cleaner and more lit up than all our (Jewish) streets, except for Pinsker Street. The shtetl's intellectuals come here for a stroll even on mid-week evenings. Brides and grooms also stroll here to “look over” one another.

 

Street description

SanitarianStreet

… whole length of street – from Reb Moshe-Mordechai Tokatshinsky's house to the … village school with two grades.

Village school

Building Description

SanitarianStreet

… whole length of street – from Reb Moshe-Mordechai Tokatshinsky's house to the … village school with two grades.

TOKATSHINSKY, Reb Moshe Mordechai

Household described as wealthy

Sanitarian Street – residential, wealthy

Reb Mich'l Binyominke,

Household described as wealthy

Sanitarian Street – residential, wealthy

BERKOVICH, Berl

Household described as wealthy

Sanitarian Street – wealthy residential

BARNAK, Zundel

Household described as wealthy

Sanitarian Street – wealthy residential

LIS, Gershon

Household described as wealthy

Sanitarian Street – wealthy residential

MAIZEL family

Household described as wealthy

Sanitarian Street – wealthy residential

LITOVSKY family

Household described as wealthy

Sanitarian Street – wealthy residential

ROZOVSKY, Leibke and his wife Hanya and [adopted] daughter Sonya

Description of family

Sanitarian Street – wealthy residential

The local Polish doctor’s residence

Doctor’s residence

Sanitarian Street – wealthy residential

The Medical assistant’s residence (Christian)

Medical Assistant’s residence

Sanitarian Street – wealthy residential

Residence and government office of title holder – Volost Office

Government Offices and official residences

Sanitarian Street – wealthy residential

Volost Court

Government Offices and official residences

Sanitarian Street – wealthy residential

Zemski Oprave (local government admin)

Government Offices and official residences

Sanitarian Street – wealthy residential

Jail

Government Offices and official residences

They bring prisoners past “Between the Shops” on Friday

Sanitarian Street – wealthy residential

Commissioner and 12 agents (gendarmes?)

To prevent break-ins like one in the past at the Monopol liquor store

Sanitarian Street – wealthy residential

 

Street description

Sanitarian Street – wealthy residential

Shmuler the lawyer

lawyer

Sanitarian Street – wealthy residential: At far end of street resides Shmuler der Advocat

Avromele, the red-headed barber: Jewish revolutionary

Barber; – no location given

 

Old Cemetery

The road Stretches far and away to the New Cemetery while having to its side, the old cemetery where famous rabbis and rebbes are buried.

Death Road – to cemeteries

 

Go back a bit from Sanitarian Street and we come to the “death road” to the Old and New Cemeteries

New Cemetery

The road Stretches far and away to the New Cemetery while having to its side, the old cemetery where famous rabbis and rebbes are buried.

Death Road – to cemeteries

 

Go back a bit from Sanitarian Street and we come to the “death road” to the Old and New Cemeteries

BUCHBINDER, Schachne

Dealer in rags and old bones

Death Road – to cemeteries

only one substantial Jew, Schachne Buchbinder, lives here, the rest are poor and beggers

-

Street Description

Death Road – to cemeteries

 

 

Up the other side of Death Road to “the Wenger” which stands before the continuation of Death Road.

-

Street Description

Synagogue Courtyard: Cross away from the Wenger on a small bridge and we come to the Synagogue Courtyard

Hasidic prayer houses

Author says 2 hasidic shtiblech

Synagogue Courtyard

The larger community Bes Midrash

Synagogue Description

Synagogue Courtyard

Cobbler’s Shul

Synagogue Description

Synagogue Courtyard

Tailor’s Shul

Synagogue Description

Synagogue Courtyard

Koidanover Shul

Synagogue Description - Too small to hold the huge crowds who would gather when the Koidanover Rebbe would come once a year

Synagogue Courtyard

 

Street Description

Kletsk Street – leave the Synagogue Couortyard through a side alley to Kletsk Street

ZAYETZ, Nyome

Building Contractor with Russian government contracts

Kletsk Street

KOPPEL, parents of A. Mukdoni the Doctor of Philosophy who became famous abroad – the wife had a bakery here, the father was a melamed in “poorest district”

bakery

Kletsk Street

KOPPEL, father of A. Mukdoni

melamed

Kletsk Street

MINTZ, Shimshel

Lumber merchant

Kletsk Street – stone house

MASS, Hirshele

 

Religious leader

Kletsk Street – house on street of rabbis and leaders

RATZKEVICH, RabbiYisroel David

Rabbi

Kletsk Street – house on street of rabbis and leaders

PAYMER, Rabbi Meir

Rabbi

Kletsk Street – house on street of rabbis and leaders

LIOS, Noah

Big pelt merchant

Kletsk Street – house on street of rabbis and leaders

ZMUDZIAK, Shaiyel,

Big merchant who does business as far as Lemberg

Kletsk Street – house on street of rabbis and leaders

BERKOVICH, Pinye

Wood merchant

Kletsk Street – house on street of rabbis and leaders

SHIFRIS, Chaim aka Chaim from Nesvizh

Melamed

Kletsk Street – house on street of rabbis and leaders

POTSHTALION, Shloime

Mail delivery concession

Kletsk Street – house on street of rabbis and leaders

Feigel-Bashe

“Colonial store”

Kletsk Street – house on street of rabbis and leaders and continues on to a “non-Jewish” section including the estate of Rushike which belonged to the Polish noblemen Reytans

Count Reytan

Landowner, nobleman

Kletsk Street- the estate of Rushike which belonged to the Polish noblemen Reytans

Countess Reytan (deported to Siberia by Soviets, alongside Jews from Lyakhovichi; she died there)

Landowner, nobleman

Kletsk Street- the estate of Rushike which belonged to the Polish noblemen Reytans

 

Street Description

Kletsk Street shortcut behind and come out at the beginning of Pinsk Street, to the left of which stretch, far and wide, gardens and fields up to the Kaminker Forest and the railway station at Rushnevich.

LIOS, Leibe

Pelt merchant

Pinsk Street , in the part which led to the Market is located the “Golden Flag” [the “flagship”] of our shtetl,

KAPLAN, Yehoshuo son of Avram Yaakov Kaplan

Leading merchant

Pinsk Street , in the part which led to the Market is located the “Golden Flag” [the “flagship”] of our shtetl,

KAPLAN, Feigele wife of Yehoshuo, she aka Feigele Avram Yakov’s

Benefactor

Pinsk Street , in the part which led to the Market is located the “Golden Flag” [the “flagship”] of our shtetl,

WEINGER, Avrom Chayim aka the new prince (der nayer noggid)

With new wealth he founded a credit bank; bought up shops, and erected two fine houses in Pinsk Street

Pinsk Street , we go up a bit and come to the well-kept house of Avrom Chaim Weinger

WOLKIN (says Valkin on page) Reb Zalman

Lumber business

Pinsk Street

BUSEL, Noah Leib and his wife Stirel

Residence

Pinsk Street – On the opposite side of the street live … simple Jews with honest souls, like Reb Yidel der Melamed and Reb Noah-Leib Busel, with their families.

 

Yidel the Melamed

Residence

Pinsk Street – On the opposite side of the street live … simple Jews with honest souls, like Reb Yidel der Melamed and Reb Noah-Leib Busel, with their families.

 

Chotshe der Roife (the Doctor)

Medical Asst

Pinsk Street – opposite Nyome Zayetz

Avrom Yaakov der Roife

Medical practitioner

Mentioned in note about Chotsche der Roife

 

Street Description

“Street that aint no Street” (Svyato Yanskaya) After Pinsk Street we take a left and enter a “street that ain't no street” but important Jews once lived here.

Reb Leibe-Motte-Sanke's

ladies' tailor; early ready ware factory

“Street that aint no Street” (Svyato Yanskaya) – on the right

Michael Aron the Baker

Baker

“Street that aint no Street” (Svyato Yanskaya)–exactly opposite [Reb Leibe Motte Sanke] by Mich’l Aron der Beker, lives one of our two town dentists in a stone house

GOLDBERG, Yitzchok-Gedalyo

Dentist

“Street that aint no Street”(Svyato Yanskaya) –exactly opposite [Reb Leibe Motte Sanke] by Mich’l Aron der Beker lives one of our two town dentists in a stone house

Reb Moshe Mordechai “ (Svyato Yanskaya)der Dardeke-Melamed” [the little children's cheder teacher] This is Rabbi Moshe Mordechai Winogrod who would die a few years later in Slutsk during WWI.

Melamed

“Street that aint no Street”(Svyato yanskaya) –Among the outstanding Jews on it

Reb Shaiye Chossid

Resident

“Street that aint no Street” – Not far from Reb Moshe Mordechai lives Reb Shaiye Chossid and a couple of paces on Reb Yankel “der Shoichet” [ritual slaughterer] and then, opposite, the talmed chochem Reb Meir Leibke's,

Reb Yankel der Schochet

Ritual slaughter

“Street that aint no Street” – Not far from Reb Moshe Mordechai lives Reb Shaiye Chossid and a couple of paces on Reb Yankel “der Shoichet” [ritual slaughterer] and then, opposite, the talmed chochem Reb Meir Leibke's

Meir Leibke’s

Resident

“Street that aint no Street”

LEV, Dovid Shlomo, son of Shaike the Dayan

Resident

“Street that aint no Street” – across from Meir Leibke’s pushed far back in the yard

Avraham Yankel der Roife

Medical Assistant, using title of Doctor

“Street that aint no Street” – Here extend courtyard after courtyard, built up with small, low houses and huts, almost one on top of the other. Here poverty nestles.

 

Alter son of Avraham Yankel der Roife

barber; strong-arm enforcer

“Street that aint no Street” – Here extend courtyard after courtyard, built up with small, low houses and huts, almost one on top of the other.

ROGOV, Chatzkel

barber

“Street that aint no Street” –Rogov’s house

SNOBL, Moishe

Artist, sign painter

Mentioned in note about Chatzkel ROGOV

 

Street Description

Mislebozh Street – at its beginning a “Papayshchine” owned by an old Tatar woman who gave permission for Jews to relax under the trees on Shabbas

BURAKES- not a real surname, but a nickname

Jewish Farmers who planted vegetables and bred geese and sold goosefat

Mislebozh Street –next to the “Papayshchine

Fire Brigade Building converted to a live theater around 1912

Building Description

When we go off a little to the right, where one catches up with Mislevozh Street – a stone building

Reb Noah “der Melamed” or Noah “Mislevozher”

melamed

Mislevozh Street

PINTSCHUK family

Resident

Mislevozh Srteet

PINTSCHUK, Shaiye

Resident

Mislevozh Street

ZMUDZIAK, Mendel aka Mendel Saban

lawyer

Mislevozh Street

Nache der Balagole (the Carter)

Team driver; carter; balagola

Mislevozh Street

MUSIKANT (No surname on page), Nishe the Klezmer Musician

Musician

Mislevozh Street

MUSIKANT (No surname on page),Shliome the flutist son of Nishe the Klezmer Musician

Musician

Mislevozh Street

Homes of non-Jewish burghers,

Street descrption

Mislevozh Street , homes of non-Jewish burghers, surrounded by gardens and orchards

GAVZE, Lemke aka Lemke Daiches

Weavers and building description

Mislevozh Street, at very end past the homes of non-Jwish burghers, in complete isolation

MAZHE, Ahare, der nayer noggid -residence

Wealthy man (title meant "of new-found wealth")

Tatars Street turned towards the town away from the part mostly inhabited by Tatars to the houses of outstanding ballebatim

KANTOROVICH, Aron Leib - residence

Residence description – wealthy man

Tatars Street turned towards the town away from the part mostly inhabited by Tatars to the houses of outstanding ballebatim

NEIMAN, Moishe

One of biggest pelt merchants in our region

Tatars Street turned towards the town to the houses of outstanding ballebatim

GAVZE, Shaiyel

Big pelt merchant

Tatars Street turned towards the town to the houses of outstanding ballebatim

GAVZE, Yehiel Asher son of Shaiyel

Big pelt merchant

Tatars Street turned towards the town to the houses of outstanding ballebatim

Rashe the baker woman, a poor widow

Baker, sold fresh bagels in the evening

Tatars Street


Important Notes about This Page

All names on this page were included in Surname Index Nov 2009

Find any name on this page by hitting "control F" on your keyboard and typing in the name.

Find any name anywhere on this website by going to the Google search bar and typing the name immediately before this phrase
site:http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/lyakhovichi/

from the word "site" to the slash after lyakhovichi (just cut and paste it into your browser)



Lyakhovichi street

Lyakhovichi's street of stone buildings "Market Square" showing the solid masonry buildings of: Abram Yankel Kaplan, Nehama Raisel's Inn (owned by Nehama Raisel and Itsche Cohen/Kagan), and a building owned by legal advocate Israel Mishkofsky, which on it's first floor held the government-owned Liquor Store, Monopol.

 

Street showing  Kantorovich and Bogin Building; Bogin's half a flour warehouse, Kantorovich half used as Lyakhovichi's Stoliner Shul

Market Square's Stone Buildings at far end where it intersects with this block of wooden structures. The large stone warehouse at the far end of this unpaved street is the Kantorovich-Bogin building on Market Square. It was split by its owners Yosef Bogin and Leibe Kantorovich. Bogin used his side for a flour Warehouse as he had connections with the largest flour companies in Russia; Kantorovich used his for his business and to house the Stoliner Hasidic congregation


 

Lyakhovichi residential area called the Rampart or the Wall
Lyakhovichi Residential Neighborhood called the Rampart (or the Wall) a neighborhood for established merchants' "fine residences" - we find the Ditkovskys who had a leather business, Shlomo Rivkin described as "the wealthy manufacturer", Asher the watchmaker and Miller "the Polish chemist," on this block and their homes are surrounded by orchards.

You will find on these Pages

Links to the three Directory Pages
Directories of Lyakhovichi - Russian Empire Period
Directories of Lyakhovichi - Polish Republic Period
Directories of Lyakhovichi - Trade and Professional.

  • 1926-1930 Images of Lyakhovichi pages The actual raw data on thousands from Lyakhovichi and Baranovichi and dependent towns
  • 1926-1930 All Lyakhovichi Names in those Directories
  • 1929 only - 1800 Extracted Names of Residents of Lyakhovichi and Baranovichi's dependent towns- inc. 1100 from Baranovichi itself; then Darewo, Derewna, Horodysczye, Krzywoszyn, Lipsk, Litwa, Lotwa Mala, Lotwa Wielko, Luki, Luki Wielkie, Niedzwiadka Wielka, Niedzwiedzica, Nowa Mysz, Nowa Wies, Podlesie, Podlisiejki, Podstarzynki, Poloneczka, Zaluze (in Lyakhovichi not Stolpce)
  • 1903 and 1911 Vsia Rossia 206 Extracted Names of Lyakhovichi, Baranovichi, Gorodysche and Novo Mysh
  • We hope to be posting the images from these directories in the future. Novo Mysh was 3 miles from Baranovichi and in 1897, Jews were more than half the 3,000 person population. When Baranovichi's train connections made it the largest town in the area, two thirds of Novo Mysh Jews migrated to Baranovichi. In the 1903 directory, the few listings for Baranovichi township, are actually for Novo Mysh which was in the township. Gorodysche was as far from Baranovichi as Lyakhovichi was from Baranovichi, continuing in a straight line northwest. But its almost 2,000 Jews in 1900, had long used Lyakhovichi as its main resource for brides and jobs. When the railroad hub in Baranovichi was built, Baranovichi became Gorodische's job center but the intermarriage from all of the communities is evident in the family names in each of the towns. I would like to find if there are separate entries from Medvedichi in this time period also,just seven miles south of Lyakhovichi it had a community of over 200 Jews in 1900.

  • Pre WWI Businesses and Residents in Lyakhovichi, by Street
  • A street by street listing of those whose businesses or residences were noted in the moving memoir A Walk through my Devastated Shtetl created in the 1950s and remembering those who lived in Lyakhovichi prior to WWI.

  • Images of Different Lyakhovichi Streets

     

     

    A reconstructed page of the 1926 Poland-Danzig Directory showing all of that year's listings for Lachowicze k. Baranowicze
    The 1926 Poland-Danzig Directory

    This image does not appear in the Polish Danzig Directory. It was created by taking several images in the 1926directory, related to Lyakhovichi and creatively recombining them, for more information content, in a single view. Copyright 2005, Deborah Glassman.
    After clicking the title to get to a larger view, you can hover your cursor in the lower right corner and internet explorer will provide an expansion icon to make the page even more readable. Click back on your browser to return.

     

     

    Vsia Rossia Business Directory
    1903 and 1911 Businesses in
    Lyakhovichi, Baranovichi,
    (and two that were later Baranovichi dependent towns-
    Novo Mysh, and Gorodysche)

    In the year column:
    L means of Lyakhovichi; B of Baranovichi, G of Gorodysche.

    Surname

    First Name

    Father’s Name

    Occupation

    Year

    ABRAMOVICH

    Yosel

    Rubin

    Grocery
    Goods

    1911G

    ADARICH

    Petr

    Adam

    Wine

    1911 L

    AGUSHEVITS

    Abram

    Movsha

    Firewood

    1911B

    AIZENKOVICH

    Vulf

    -

    Textiles

    1911 L

    AIZIKONITSKIY
    (See AIZIKOVITSKIY 1911)

    Shmuil

    Mordukh

    Pharmacy
    Goods

    1903G

    AIZIKOVICH

    Shaya

    Leiba

    Bread-Grain

    1903 L

    AIZIKOVITSKY

    Shmerka/

    Shmuilo

    Mordukh

    Pharmacy
    Goods

    1911G

    ALINSKY

    Gitlya

     

    Textiles

    1911B

    ANEKSHTEIN

    Fruma

    Aron

    Dishes

    1903B
    Novo-
    mysh

    ANGILOVICH

    Yankel'

    Leizer

    Textiles

    1903 L

    APANASEVICH

    Matvey

    Osip

    Rooms

    1911B

    BEGUN

    Yosel

    Movsha

    Flour

    1911B

    BEGUN*

    Yosel

    Movsha

    Flour

    1911 L

    BELOUS

    Reiza

    Aron

    Grocery
    Goods
    +Tobacco

    1911B

    BELSKY

    Girsh

    Ovsey

    Leather
    Goods

    1911G

    BERKOVICH

    Girsh

    Borukh

    Pharmacy

    1911 L

    BERKOVICH

    G.

    Shmuil

    Grocery
    Goods

    1911B

    BERNIKER

    Elya

    Abram

    Grocery
    Goods

    +Tobacco

    1911B

    BIRGER

    Gdalya

    Yudel'

    Brewery

    1903 L

    BORETSKY

    Leya

    Izrail

    Grocery
    Goods

    1911B

    BRECHKO

    Yulian

    Stepan

    Wine

    1911 L

    BREGMAN

    Girsh

    Girsh

    Leather
    Goods+
    shoes

    1911B

    BREGMAN

    Mordukh

    Shlyoma

    Textiles

    1911B

    BRESLAVSKY

    Rivka

    Yankel

    Textiles

    1911 L

    BREVDA

    Khana

    Khaim

    Brewery

    1903 L

    BREVDA

    Shaya

    Shimen

    Grocery
    Goods

    +Tobacco

    1911B

    BROIDO

    Nison

    Abram

    Leather
    Goods

    1911B

    BRUK

    Reizya

    -

    Leather
    Goods

    1911 L

    BUSEL

    Khaya

    Itsko

    Textiles

    1911 L

    BUSEL

    Moisey

    Mikhel

    Grocery
    Goods

    +Tobacco

    1911B

    BUSEL

    Zelda

    Faivish

    Textiles

    1911B

    BUSEL

    Zelda

    Faivish

    Grocery
    Goods

    1911B

    BUSEL

    Zimel

    Aizik

    Grocery
    Goods

    +Tobacco

    1911B

    BYTENSKY

    Dveira

    Movsha

    Flour

    1911B

    BYTENSKY

    Sora

    Movsha

    Flour*

    1911B

    BYTENSKY

    Sora

    Movsha

    Grocery
    Goods

    +Tobacco

    1911B

    DAVIDOVSKY

    Feiga

    -

    Pharmacy

    1911 L

    DITKOVSKY

    Peisakh

    Dovid

    Leather
    Goods

    1911 L

    DOROSHEVICH

    Sergey

    Andrey

    Grocery
    Goods

    1911B

    DUKER

    Abram

    Leizer

    Textiles

    1911G

    DVORETSKY

    Leya

    Movsha

    Grocery
    Goods

    +Tobacco

    1911B

    DVORETSKY

    Freida

    Itsko

    Grocery
    Goods

    +Tobacco

    1911B

    DZENTSYULSKY

    Sora

    Zalman

    Grocery
    Goods

    1911B

    EIGES

    Abram-Itsko

    Khaim

    Grocery

    1903 L

    ERUZALIMSKY

    Girsh

    Borukh

    Bricks

    1911B

    EVERIL

    Zimel'

    Movsha

    Pharmacy
    Goods

    1903G

    EVNOVICH

    Rafal

    Zisel

    Grocery
    Goods

    +Tobacco

    1911B

    FILIPOVSKY

    Yankel

    Shlyoma

    Furniture

    1911B

    FUKSMAN

    Aron

    Abram

    Textiles

    1911B

    GABRIELYOVICH

    Yosel

    Shlyoma

    Grocery
    Goods

    +Tobacco

    1911B

    GABRIELYOVICH

    Yosel

    Shlyoma

    Flour*

    1911B

    GALAY

    Betya

    Meyer

    Grocery
    Goods

    1911B

    GALAY

    Mordukh

    Khaim

    Leather
    Goods

    1911B

    GALAY

    Beilya

    Meyer

    IronHardware

    1911B

    GASH

    Alta

    -

    Textiles

    1911 L

    GAVZE

    Mordukh

    Shaya

    Textiles

    1911 L

    GERBER

    Fruma

    -

    Wine

    1911 L

    GINZBURG

    Shoina

    Mendel

    Flour*

    1911B

    GINZBURG

    Sheina

    Mendel

    Tobacco

    1911B

    GIRSHEVICH

    Efroim

    Z.

    Grocery
    Goods

    1911G

    GIRSHEVICH

    Z.

    E.

    Textiles

    1911G

    GIRSHEVICH

    Efroim

    Zov.

    Tobacco

    1911G

    GOLDINBERG

    Kasriel

    Leib

    Textiles

    1911B

    GOLPERIN

    Srol-Zalmon

    Girsh

    IronHardware

    1911B

    GOLPERIN

    Shmerka/uilo

     

     

    IronHardware

    1911B

    GOSKIND

    Meyer

    Osher

    FunishedRooms

    1911G

    GRABOVETSKY

    Mordukh

    Movsha

    Beer

    1911B

    GURALSKY

    Itsko-Nevakh

    Tsalko

    Grocery
    Goods

    +Tobacco

    1911B

    IZIGZON

    Girsh

    Meyer

    Textiles

    1911B

    IZRAILEVICH

    Khaim

    Aron

    Grocery
    Goods

    +Tobacco

    1911B

    IZRAILEVICH

    Mordukh

    Aron

    Grocery
    Goods

    +Tobacco

    1911B

    IZRAILEVICH

    Mordukh

    Aron

    Textiles

    1911B

    IZRAILEVICH

    Leya

    Mikhel

    IronHardware

    1911G

    IZRAILIT

    Khava

    L.

    Tobacco

    1911B

    KAGAN

    Volf

    Abram

    Flour

    1911 L

    KAGAN

    Abram

    Khaim

    Clocks

    1911B

    KAGAN

    Leiba

    Shmuil.

    Textile
    Goods

    1903G

    KANTOROVICH

    Leiba

    Shlyoma

    Haber-
    dashery

    1911 L

    KAPLAN

    Abram

    Yankel'

    Wood

    1903 L

    KAPLAN

    Rafal

    Volf

    Dutch Tile

    1911B

    KAPLAN

    Yudel'

    Yankel'

    Grocery

    1903G

    KAPLAN

    Yudka

    Yankel

    Wine

    1911G

    KHAIMOVICH

    David

    Pinkhus

    Grocery
    Goods

    +Tobacco

    1911B

    KONTOROVICH

    Abram

     

    Grocery
    Goods

    1911B

    KOPOLCHUK

    Leiba

    Girsh

    Beer

    1911G

    KORELITSKY

    Ikhel

    Yankel

    IronHardware

    1911B

    KUNTSEVITSKY

    Beilya

    Abram

    Textiles

    1911B

    LEIBOVICH

    Mordukh

     

    Textiles

    1911G

    LEKERT

    -

    -

    Wine

    1911 L

    LEKERT

    -

    -

    Tavern

    1911 L

    LEV

    Berko

    Mikhel

    Flour

    1911 L

    LEVIN

    Mera

    Leiba

    Textiles

    1903 L

    LEVIN

    Nokhm.

    Abram

    Broker

    1911 L

    LICHITSKY

    Yudka

    Yankel

    Pharmacy

    1911 L

    LIFSHITS

    Mordukh

    Movsha

    Grocery
    Goods

    1911B

    LIMON

    Alter/Alta

    Benyamin

    IronHardware

    1911B

    LIPSKY

    N.

    E.

    Tavern

    1911B

    LIS

    Elya

    Mikhel

    Grocery
    Goods

    1911G

    LITVAK

    Moisey

    N.

    Stationery

    1911B

    MALOVITSKY

    Shmuilo

    -

    Flour

    1911 L

    MENDELEVICH

    Dvosya

    Leib

    Grocery
    Goods

    +Tobacco

    1911B

    MILETSKAYA

    Zidlya

    -

    Textiles

    1903 L

    MILETSKY

    S.

    Yosel

    Textiles

    1911 L

    MILLE

    -

    -

    Pharmacy

    1903 L

    MILLER

    Videl

    Viktor

    Pharmacy

    1911 L

    MILOVIDSKY

    Khaim

    Nevakh

    Dishes

    1911B

    MINAKER

    Aron

    Girsh

    Textiles

    1911G

    MINKOVICH

    Riva

    Yankel

    Tobacco

    1911B

    MINSKER

    Girsh

    Gfalkev.?

    Textile
    Goods

    1903G

    MINTS

    Meyer

    Beniamin

    Furniture

    1903B

    Novo-

    mysh

    MINTS

    Meyer

    Benyamin

    Furniture

    1911B

    MINTS

    Zimel'

    Beniamin

    Stationery

    1903B

    Novo-

    mysh

    MIRSKY

    Itska

    Aron

    Grocery
    Goods

    +Tobacco

    1911B

    MIRSKY

    Ginda

    Volf

    Grocery
    Goods

    +Tobacco

    1911B

    MITROPOL-
    ITANSKY

    Leizer

    Abram

    Textiles

    1911B

    MITROPOL-
    ITANSKY

    Ega

    Ovsey

    Clocks

    1911B

    MOLCHADSKY

    Khaya

    Abram

    Grocery
    Goods

    1911B

    MOLCHADSKY

    David

    Berka

    Grocery
    Goods

    1911G

    MORDUKHOVICH

    D.

    Khaim

    Grocery
    Goods

    1911G

    MOVSHOVICH

    Mordukh

    Shmuil

    Grocery

    1903G

    MOVSHOVICH

    Iser

    Mordukh

    Grocery
    Goods

    1911G

    MURZICH

    Osman

    Zakhar

    Tavern

    1911 L

    MYSKY

    Fruma - Mirka

     

    Grocery
    Goods

    1911B

    NAKHIMOVICH

    Khaya

    Mikhel

    Grocery
    Goods

    +Tobacco

    1911B

    NASLEDN

    -

    -

    Pharmacy

    1903 L

    NEMAN

    Giler

    Yosel

    Grocery
    Goods

    1911G

    OLKOVICH

    Abram

    Leib

    Leather
    Goods

    1911B

    OSHEROVICH

    Osher

    Benyamin

    Shoes

    1911G

    PENCHANSKY

    Leiba

    Mikhel

    Grocery
    Goods

    +Tobacco

    1911B

    PENCHANSKY

    Sulya

    Abram

    Grocery
    Goods

    1911G

    PENCHANSKY

    Sulya

    Abram

    Tobacco

    1911G

    PENSHANSKY

    Sulya

    Abram

    Textiles

    1911G

    PERCHIK

    Dvosha

    Solomon

    Haber-
    dashery

    1911B

    PERELMAN

    Leiba

    Izrail

    Grocery
    Goods

    1911G

    PEREVOLOTSKY

    Shlyoma

    Itsko

    Grocery
    Goods

    +Tobacco

    1911B

    PINCHUK

    Itska

    Yosel'

    Grocery

    1903 L

    PODLISHEVSKY

    Vulf

    Girsh

    Pharmacy

    1911B

    PODLISHEVSKY

    Vulf

    Girsh

    Wine

    1911B

    POGORELSKY

    Feiga

    Pinkhus

    Grocery
    Goods

    1911B

    POGORELSKY

    Malka-Leya

     

    Grocery
    Goods

    +Tobacco

    1911B

    POGORELSKY

    Yankel

    Khaim

    Grocery
    Goods

    1911B

    POGORELSKY

    Yankel

    Khaim

    Flour*

    1911B

    POLONETSKY

    Rubin

    Evel

    Beer

    1911G

    RABINOVICH

    Aizik

    Mordukh

    Pharmacy
    Goods

    1911B

    RABINOVICH

    Liba

    Isaak

    Wine

    1911B

    RABINOVICH

    Mordukh

    Yosel

    Stationery

    1911B

    RAKOV

    Yudka

    Aron

    Kerosene

    1911B

    RAKOVSKY

    Kamaliya

     

    Pharmacy

    1911G

    RATNER

    Zalka

    -

    Textiles

    1911 L

    RIVKIN

    Shlema

    Yankel'

    Textiles

    1903 L

    ROZHANSKY

    Riva

    Yudel

    Grocery
    Goods

    1911G

    RYBKIN

    Shlyoma

    Yankel

    Textiles

    1911 L

    SADOVSKY

    Yankel

    Kalman

    Flour

    1911B

    SALUTSKY

    Itka

    Leib

    Grocery
    Goods

    1911G

    SALUTSKY

    Itka

    Leib

    Textiles

    1911G

    SALUTSKY

    Itka

    Leib

    Tobacco

    1911G

    SAPOZHNIK

    Leiba

    Yudel

    Grocery
    Goods

    +Tobacco

    1911B

    SAVITSKY

    Braina

    Shimen

    Grocery
    Goods

    1911B

    SAVITSKY

    Braina

    Shimen

    Flour*

    1911B

    SELTSOVSKY

    Sara

    Zalman

    Grocery
    Goods

    1911G

    SHEIN

    Nota

    Yankel'

    Pharmacy
    Goods

    1903 L

    SHEIN

    Sora

    -

    Pharmacy

    1911 L

    SHERESHEVSKY

    Yosel

    Aron

    Textiles

    1911B

    SHERESHEVSKY

    Mordukh

    David

    Textiles

    1911B

    SHERESHEVSKY

    Genya

    Dovid

    Textiles

    1911B

    SHERESHEVSKY

    Moisey

    Leizer

    Textiles

    1911B

    SHIMANSKY

    Berko

    Itsko

    Jeweler

    1911B

    SHIRAN

    Anton

    Ignat

    Beer

    1911B

    SHKLOVSKIY

    Zelman

    Leizer

    Textiles

    1903 L

    SLONIMSKY

    Mina

    Isaak

    Tobacco

    1911B

    SLUTSKY

    Meyer

    Leizer

    Haber-
    dashery

    1911B

    SLUTSKY

    Meyer

    Leizer

    Leather
    Goods

    1911B

    SOLODUKHA

    Yosel

    Izrail

    Grocery
    Goods

    +Tobacco

    1911B

    SOLODUKHA

    Yosel

    Izrail

    Flour*

    1911B

    SPEKTOR

    Aron

    David

    Beer

    1911B

    SROGOVICH

    Rakhmiel

    Z.

    Pharmacy
    Goods

    1911B

    TAUBKIN

    David

    Lev

    Beer

    1911G

    TROETSKY

    Yankel

    -

    Flour

    1911 L

    TRUBOVICH

    Moisey

    Yakov

    Tobacco

    1911B

    TRUBOVICH

    Dveira

    Z.

    Grocery
    Goods

    1911G

    TSIRINSKY

    Mus.

    Srol

    Haber-
    dashery

    1911G

    TUKACHINSKY

    Movsha

    Mikhel

    Flour

    1911 L

    TUKACHINSKY

    R.

    F.

    Textiles

    1911G

    TURETSKY

    E.

    K.

    Leather
    Goods

    1911B

    VARSHAL

    Perla

    Yosel'

    Beer-Honey

    1903 L

    VEITSEL

    Basha

    Girsh

    Textiles

    1911B

    VERNIKOVSKY

    Z.

    Girsh

    Grocery
    Goods

    1911B

    VERTGEIM [Wertheim]

    Shmerka/ uilo

    Zalman

    Wine

    1911B

    VOLFOVICH

    Izrael'

    David

    Textile
    Goods

    1903G

    VOLFOVSKY

    Sara

    Shaya

    Grocery
    Goods

    +Tobacco

    1911B

    VOLOKH-
    VYANSKY

    Khonya

    Abram

    Dishes

    1911B

    VYGODSKY

    Shlema

    Mordukh

    Textiles

    1911B

    YASINOVSKY

    Sora

    Yosel

    Textiles

    1911B

    YUDELEVICH

    Shlyoma

    Movsha

    Grocery
    Goods

    1911B

    YUDELEVICH

    Sara

    Aron

    Grocery
    Goods

    1911G

    ZABLOTSKIY

    Abram-Shmuil

    Movsha

    Textiles

    1903B

    Novo-

    mysh

    ZABLOTSKY

    Mina

    Faivish

    Textiles

    1911 L

    ZDANOVSKY

    Izrael

    Ovsey

    Grocery
    Goods

    1911G

    ZHMOIDSKY

    B.

    Abram

    Ready-Made
    Clothing

    1911B

    ZHUKHO-
    VITSKY

    N.

    Girsh

    Haber-
    dashery

    1911B

    ZHUKHO-
    VITSKY

    Shmuil

    Zisel (Zus)

    Haber-
    dashery

    1911B

    ZHUKHO-
    VITSKY

    Shmuil

    Zisel (Zus)

    Grocery
    Goods

    1911B

    ZHUKHO-
    VITSKY

    Tsipa

    Mordukh

    Grocery
    Goods

    1911G

    ZILIKOVICH

    Izrael

    Leib

    Textiles

    1911G

    ZMUDZYAK

    Khaim

    Mordukh

    Tavern

    1911 L

    ZYSKIND

    Meita

    Yankel

    Iron Hardware

    1911 L


     

    Maps created in the investigation of Lyakhovichi property records in the Minsk Archives