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Minkovt'sy, Ukraine

Minkovitz (Yiddish)  מינקאוויץ

Minkowce [Pol],Myn'kivtsi [Ukr], Myn'kivci

Lat: 48° 51' N, Long: 27° 06'E



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Minkovtsy  Homepage
History
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Emigrants
Holocaust
Landsmanshaften
Photos
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Compiled by Barbara Ellman

Updated: Mar, 2016

Copyright © 2016
Barbara Ellman




Minkovt'sy is situated 60 km northeast of Kamenets-Podolskii, on the way to Vinnitsa.  


The town is located in the broad valley surrounded by high hills, on the banks of the


Ushitsa river (a tributary of the Dnestr), on the road between Dunaevtsy (21 km)


and Novaia Ushitsa (13 km).


            Synagogue

                                            Minkovitz Synagogue

Built in 1776, the big wooden synagogue was located on the bank of the Ushitsa River.  An ezrat nashim (women's gallery) was added later to the second level.  The walls and cupola were decorated with frescos, some included prayers and psalms.  The frescos included symbolic mystical depictions of a battle between a lion and a unicorn and a carriage passing through the gates
and other representations of Paradise.


Maps


         1908 Map of Minkovitz area

             1908
                      Map


Visit to Minkovt'sy

      Thanks to Joan Adler and Bobbi Furst for providing a trip report of their visit to our ancestors home




Books about Minkowitz

Spoon from Minkowitz This funny, sad, thoroughly engaging book just came out to critical acclaim.  It is about Judith Fein's search for Minkowitz, and how it turned her life into a detective story and solved the mystery of where she came from and what remains of the world her grandmother left behind.

The book was published in Jan, 2014. (Click on the book's image to connect to Amazon to order)

Photos by Judith's husband, Paul Ross are located on the Photos page.






Looking Back
"This book is centered around the memoir "Looking Back", written in 1928 by then 20 year old Isadore Weiss, only six years after coming to the United States. Isadore provides a fascinating insight into Jewish life in the Ukrainian village of Minkovitz before, during and after World War One. As the war reaches Minkovitz, the reader experiences the rare insight of the community's reaction to the fighting, the first cars, first motorcycles and first airplanes ever seen by people in that region. Contrary to popular current thought, we also see the excellent relationship between the Jewish community of Minkovitz and the German occupying troops, who made toys and gathered firewood for the homes of the people where they were housed during the winter. Isadore also recounts the artillery and the hand-to-hand combat between the forces of Simon Petlura, leader of the pogroms, and the Bolsheviks. We get to see how the new Communist regime establishes itself in Ukraine.

Isadore's wife, Sylvia, rounds out the story of how they built a life together in the United States. The story continues of how Isadore graduated with honors from the University of Pittsburgh, and then worked as a Federal investigator as he overcame the barriers of a new language and anti-Semitism.

Contributing authors provide background on the contemporary social, demographic and political environment in Ukraine to help the reader put "Looking Back" into context."

Searchable Databases

      Click the button to show all entries for Minkovt’sy in the JewishGen Ukraine Database. (About the JewishGen Ukraine Database).

      JewishGen "All Ukraine Database" is a multiple database search facility, which incorporates all of the following databases: Yizkor Book Necrologies, JewishGen Family Finder (JGFF), JewishGen Online Worldwide Burial Registry (JOWBR), JG Discussion Group Archives, SIG Mailing List Archives and much much more.
International Jewish Cemetery Project
Photos of the cemetery are found on the Photos page


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