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L'vove, Kherson, Ukraine
Introduction


The Road to L'vove from Highway M23
The sign says L'vove in Ukrainian


L'vove was founded in Kherson gubernia (4647' N, 3309' E) in 1840 as a Jewish agricultural colony by Jews from Courland (now part of Latvia).

Originally, the name was preceded by Kolonie (Yiddish) or Koloniya (Russian), meaning a colony, but that was eventually dropped. Spelling variations included Lwowo (Yiddish), L'vovo (Russian) and the current Ukrainian L'vove. For more information please see JGFF Town Search.

The 1877 map of the village contains around 80 houses, a sinagogue and a school. As of 1939 census the L'vove population was 2134 (that number may include non-Jewish population).

The Jewish cemetery was established in 1890 and the last burial was in 1941. The type of Jewish community which used this cemetery was Hasidic. Unfortunately, the cemetery was vandalized during the WWII and later removed.

L'vove ceased to exist as a Jewish settlement in 1941 when its entire Jewish population was executed by the advancing German army.

One of L'vove researchers (Dmitry) visited L'vove on June 26, 2003. All colored pictured on this web site were taken during that trip.

Records from Kolonie L'vove were located at the Central Archives for the History of Jewish People in Jerusalem. There is a Jewishgen Project to acquire and translate these records.


Compiled by Marco Curzon (z"l), Sarah Lee Meyer Christiansen and Dmitry Abrahamson. Updated December 8, 2013. Copyright © 2008 Dmitry Abrahamson and Sarah L. M. Christiansen

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JewishGen | KehilaLinks | Colonies of Ukraine | Courland SIG
MapQuest Map | Search JGFF | All Latvia Database
All Ukraine Database | | Ukraine SIG
Introduction | 1840 History | 1877 Map | 1941 Shoah | 2003 Visit